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Reduced hornbill abundance associated with low seed arrival and altered recruitment in a hunted and logged tropical forest.

Naniwadekar R, Shukla U, Isvaran K, Datta A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We compared hornbill abundances across these two sites.Abundances of recruits of two tree species were significantly higher in the less disturbed site.Based on our results, we present a conceptual model depicting the relationships and pathways between vertebrate-dispersed trees, their dispersers, and the impacts of hunting and logging on these pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nature Conservation Foundation, Mysore, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Logging and hunting are two key direct threats to the survival of wildlife in the tropics, and also disrupt important ecosystem processes. We investigated the impacts of these two factors on the different stages of the seed dispersal cycle, including abundance of plants and their dispersers and dispersal of seeds and recruitment, in a tropical forest in north-east India. We focused on hornbills, which are important seed dispersers in these forests, and their food tree species. We compared abundances of hornbill food tree species in a site with high logging and hunting pressures (heavily disturbed) with a site that had no logging and relatively low levels of hunting (less disturbed) to understand logging impacts on hornbill food tree abundance. We compared hornbill abundances across these two sites. We, then, compared the scatter-dispersed seed arrival of five large-seeded tree species and the recruitment of four of those species. Abundances of hornbill food trees that are preferentially targeted by logging were two times higher in the less disturbed site as compared to the heavily disturbed site while that of hornbills was 22 times higher. The arrival of scatter-dispersed seeds was seven times higher in the less disturbed site. Abundances of recruits of two tree species were significantly higher in the less disturbed site. For another species, abundances of younger recruits were significantly lower while that of older recruits were higher in the heavily disturbed site. Our findings suggest that logging reduces food plant abundance for an important frugivore-seed disperser group, while hunting diminishes disperser abundances, with an associated reduction in seed arrival and altered recruitment of animal-dispersed tree species in the disturbed site. Based on our results, we present a conceptual model depicting the relationships and pathways between vertebrate-dispersed trees, their dispersers, and the impacts of hunting and logging on these pathways.

No MeSH data available.


Seed arrival per day in heavily and less disturbed sites.Bootstrap mean and 95% confidence intervals of number of seeds per day per 200 m2 (200 1 m2 plots per trail) in the less disturbed site (Namdapha) and the heavily disturbed site (Miao).
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pone.0120062.g004: Seed arrival per day in heavily and less disturbed sites.Bootstrap mean and 95% confidence intervals of number of seeds per day per 200 m2 (200 1 m2 plots per trail) in the less disturbed site (Namdapha) and the heavily disturbed site (Miao).

Mentions: We detected seeds of all the five species (Phoebe sp., Canarium strictum, Beilschmiedia assamica, Alseodaphne petiolaris, and Dysoxylum sp.) at the less disturbed site and only two species (Canarium strictum and Alseodaphne petiolaris) at the heavily disturbed site. The mean arrival rate of the each of the five species was higher in the less disturbed site as compared to the heavily disturbed site (Table 2). Scatter-dispersed seed arrival was seven times higher at the less disturbed site as compared to heavily disturbed site (z1, 10 = -2.366, p = 0.018; Fig. 4; S4 Table).


Reduced hornbill abundance associated with low seed arrival and altered recruitment in a hunted and logged tropical forest.

Naniwadekar R, Shukla U, Isvaran K, Datta A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Seed arrival per day in heavily and less disturbed sites.Bootstrap mean and 95% confidence intervals of number of seeds per day per 200 m2 (200 1 m2 plots per trail) in the less disturbed site (Namdapha) and the heavily disturbed site (Miao).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363152&req=5

pone.0120062.g004: Seed arrival per day in heavily and less disturbed sites.Bootstrap mean and 95% confidence intervals of number of seeds per day per 200 m2 (200 1 m2 plots per trail) in the less disturbed site (Namdapha) and the heavily disturbed site (Miao).
Mentions: We detected seeds of all the five species (Phoebe sp., Canarium strictum, Beilschmiedia assamica, Alseodaphne petiolaris, and Dysoxylum sp.) at the less disturbed site and only two species (Canarium strictum and Alseodaphne petiolaris) at the heavily disturbed site. The mean arrival rate of the each of the five species was higher in the less disturbed site as compared to the heavily disturbed site (Table 2). Scatter-dispersed seed arrival was seven times higher at the less disturbed site as compared to heavily disturbed site (z1, 10 = -2.366, p = 0.018; Fig. 4; S4 Table).

Bottom Line: We compared hornbill abundances across these two sites.Abundances of recruits of two tree species were significantly higher in the less disturbed site.Based on our results, we present a conceptual model depicting the relationships and pathways between vertebrate-dispersed trees, their dispersers, and the impacts of hunting and logging on these pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nature Conservation Foundation, Mysore, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Logging and hunting are two key direct threats to the survival of wildlife in the tropics, and also disrupt important ecosystem processes. We investigated the impacts of these two factors on the different stages of the seed dispersal cycle, including abundance of plants and their dispersers and dispersal of seeds and recruitment, in a tropical forest in north-east India. We focused on hornbills, which are important seed dispersers in these forests, and their food tree species. We compared abundances of hornbill food tree species in a site with high logging and hunting pressures (heavily disturbed) with a site that had no logging and relatively low levels of hunting (less disturbed) to understand logging impacts on hornbill food tree abundance. We compared hornbill abundances across these two sites. We, then, compared the scatter-dispersed seed arrival of five large-seeded tree species and the recruitment of four of those species. Abundances of hornbill food trees that are preferentially targeted by logging were two times higher in the less disturbed site as compared to the heavily disturbed site while that of hornbills was 22 times higher. The arrival of scatter-dispersed seeds was seven times higher in the less disturbed site. Abundances of recruits of two tree species were significantly higher in the less disturbed site. For another species, abundances of younger recruits were significantly lower while that of older recruits were higher in the heavily disturbed site. Our findings suggest that logging reduces food plant abundance for an important frugivore-seed disperser group, while hunting diminishes disperser abundances, with an associated reduction in seed arrival and altered recruitment of animal-dispersed tree species in the disturbed site. Based on our results, we present a conceptual model depicting the relationships and pathways between vertebrate-dispersed trees, their dispersers, and the impacts of hunting and logging on these pathways.

No MeSH data available.