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A single pair of neurons modulates egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

Wu CL, Fu TF, Chou YY, Yeh SR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present study, we found that amnesiac (amn) mutant flies show significant defects in egg-laying decisions, and such defects can be reversed by expressing the wild-type amn transgene in two dorsal paired medial (DPM) neurons in the brain.Finally, the activity in mushroom body αβ neurons is required for the egg-laying behavior, suggesting a possible "DPM-αβ neurons" brain circuit modulating egg-laying decisions.Our results highlight the brain circuits and molecular mechanisms of egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Animals have to judge environmental cues and choose the most suitable option for them from many different options. Female fruit flies selecting an optimum site to deposit their eggs is a biologically important reproductive behavior. When given the direct choice between ovipositing their eggs in a sucrose-containing medium or a caffeine-containing medium, female flies prefer the latter. However, the neural circuits and molecules that regulate this decision-making processes during egg-laying site selection remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that amnesiac (amn) mutant flies show significant defects in egg-laying decisions, and such defects can be reversed by expressing the wild-type amn transgene in two dorsal paired medial (DPM) neurons in the brain. Silencing neuronal activity with an inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) in DPM neurons also impairs egg-laying decisions. Finally, the activity in mushroom body αβ neurons is required for the egg-laying behavior, suggesting a possible "DPM-αβ neurons" brain circuit modulating egg-laying decisions. Our results highlight the brain circuits and molecular mechanisms of egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

amn mutants show defects in egg-laying decisions.(A) In sucrose/caffeine chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 34–35, ***P < 0.001). (B) In sucrose/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 20, ***P < 0.001, **P < 0.01). (C) In caffeine/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 23–27, ***P < 0.001).
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pone.0121335.g002: amn mutants show defects in egg-laying decisions.(A) In sucrose/caffeine chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 34–35, ***P < 0.001). (B) In sucrose/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 20, ***P < 0.001, **P < 0.01). (C) In caffeine/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 23–27, ***P < 0.001).

Mentions: amn encodes a preproneuropeptide with limited similarity to pituitary-adenylyl-cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) [22]. It has been reported that AMN plays a critical role in behaviors of Drosophila such as olfactory memory and sleep [5,7,23]. To examine the role of the amn gene in egg-laying decisions, a collection of amn mutants were analyzed for their egg-laying preference in the behavioral chambers. Interestingly, we found that amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 mutants showed significant defects in egg-laying preference compared to wild-type flies (Fig. 2A). We further examined the egg-laying preference in the chamber containing sucrose or caffeine substrate in one side and a plain substrate in the opposite side. Consistent with the previous findings, wild-type female flies avoided laying eggs on sucrose (Fig. 2B) or caffeine (Fig. 2C) substrates when the other option was a plain substrate [1]. All the amn mutants show significant difference in egg-laying preference in sucrose/plain or caffeine/plain chambers compared to wild-type flies (Fig. 2B and 2C). These results indicate the amn gene is critical for egg-laying decisions in sucrose/caffeine, sucrose/plain, and caffeine/plain mediums.


A single pair of neurons modulates egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

Wu CL, Fu TF, Chou YY, Yeh SR - PLoS ONE (2015)

amn mutants show defects in egg-laying decisions.(A) In sucrose/caffeine chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 34–35, ***P < 0.001). (B) In sucrose/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 20, ***P < 0.001, **P < 0.01). (C) In caffeine/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 23–27, ***P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363143&req=5

pone.0121335.g002: amn mutants show defects in egg-laying decisions.(A) In sucrose/caffeine chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 34–35, ***P < 0.001). (B) In sucrose/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. amnX8 showed significant difference compared to the other amn mutants. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 20, ***P < 0.001, **P < 0.01). (C) In caffeine/plain chamber, amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 flies showed significant difference in egg-laying decisions compared to wild-type flies. Each value represents mean ± SEM (n = 23–27, ***P < 0.001).
Mentions: amn encodes a preproneuropeptide with limited similarity to pituitary-adenylyl-cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) [22]. It has been reported that AMN plays a critical role in behaviors of Drosophila such as olfactory memory and sleep [5,7,23]. To examine the role of the amn gene in egg-laying decisions, a collection of amn mutants were analyzed for their egg-laying preference in the behavioral chambers. Interestingly, we found that amn1, amn28A, amnc651, and amnX8 mutants showed significant defects in egg-laying preference compared to wild-type flies (Fig. 2A). We further examined the egg-laying preference in the chamber containing sucrose or caffeine substrate in one side and a plain substrate in the opposite side. Consistent with the previous findings, wild-type female flies avoided laying eggs on sucrose (Fig. 2B) or caffeine (Fig. 2C) substrates when the other option was a plain substrate [1]. All the amn mutants show significant difference in egg-laying preference in sucrose/plain or caffeine/plain chambers compared to wild-type flies (Fig. 2B and 2C). These results indicate the amn gene is critical for egg-laying decisions in sucrose/caffeine, sucrose/plain, and caffeine/plain mediums.

Bottom Line: In the present study, we found that amnesiac (amn) mutant flies show significant defects in egg-laying decisions, and such defects can be reversed by expressing the wild-type amn transgene in two dorsal paired medial (DPM) neurons in the brain.Finally, the activity in mushroom body αβ neurons is required for the egg-laying behavior, suggesting a possible "DPM-αβ neurons" brain circuit modulating egg-laying decisions.Our results highlight the brain circuits and molecular mechanisms of egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Animals have to judge environmental cues and choose the most suitable option for them from many different options. Female fruit flies selecting an optimum site to deposit their eggs is a biologically important reproductive behavior. When given the direct choice between ovipositing their eggs in a sucrose-containing medium or a caffeine-containing medium, female flies prefer the latter. However, the neural circuits and molecules that regulate this decision-making processes during egg-laying site selection remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that amnesiac (amn) mutant flies show significant defects in egg-laying decisions, and such defects can be reversed by expressing the wild-type amn transgene in two dorsal paired medial (DPM) neurons in the brain. Silencing neuronal activity with an inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) in DPM neurons also impairs egg-laying decisions. Finally, the activity in mushroom body αβ neurons is required for the egg-laying behavior, suggesting a possible "DPM-αβ neurons" brain circuit modulating egg-laying decisions. Our results highlight the brain circuits and molecular mechanisms of egg-laying decisions in Drosophila.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus