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Rumination and interoceptive accuracy predict the occurrence of the thermal grill illusion of pain.

Scheuren R, Sütterlin S, Anton F - BMC Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness perceptions were rated on a combined verbal-numerical scale (NRS).Our findings allowed identifying psychological factors substantially involved in the individual pre-disposition to reporting painful sensations in the thermal grill paradigm.These psychological characteristics may also be relevant in the context of central neuropathic pain, which to a large extent incorporates the same neural pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Behaviour, Integrative Research Unit on Social and Individual Development, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg.

ABSTRACT

Background: While the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI) have been thoroughly studied, psychological determinants largely remain unknown. The present study aimed to investigate whether cognitive and affective personality traits encompassing rumination, interoception, and suggestibility may be identified as characteristics favouring the elicitation of paradoxical pain experiences.

Methods: The dominant hand of 54 healthy volunteers was stimulated with a water-bath driven thermal grill providing an interlaced temperature combination of 15 and 41°C. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness perceptions were rated on a combined verbal-numerical scale (NRS). Traits were assessed via questionnaires, the heartbeat-tracking task, and warmth suggestions.

Results: Logistic regression analyses uncovered trait rumination and interoceptive accuracy (IA) as major predictors of the likelihood of the illusive pain occurrence (all p < .05). Rumination and suggestibility had an impact on unpleasant pain perceptions.

Conclusion: Our findings allowed identifying psychological factors substantially involved in the individual pre-disposition to reporting painful sensations in the thermal grill paradigm. These psychological characteristics may also be relevant in the context of central neuropathic pain, which to a large extent incorporates the same neural pathways.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Custom-built thermal grill device. W: warm tubes; C: cold tubes.
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Fig1: Custom-built thermal grill device. W: warm tubes; C: cold tubes.

Mentions: A custom-built and water-bath driven thermal grill device was used to elicit the paradoxical pain (Curio, I., PhD, Medical Electronics, Bonn/Germany). The thermal grill was composed of eight alternating cold and warm pipes made of borosilicate glass. The glass pipes were spaced at a distance of 7.5 mm by means of separating bars to prevent any ‘mixing phenomenon’ between pipes. The bars were made of 5 mm hollow (thickness 0.5 mm) polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with negligible thermal conductivity. The total surface of the rectangular pipes measured 20 × 10 cm (see Figure 1). The temperatures were regulated with two separate thermoelectric recirculating chillers (T255P, ThermoTek Inc.) delivering the water to the grill pipes through separate flexible and insulated plastic conduits. The flow rate of the pump was 3,86 l/min, approx. 15 ml/s per glass pipe. The volume of one glass pipe was about 16.5 cm3. The fluid content of each pipe was exchanged at a rate of about one second. The fluid temperature was continuously controlled with a digital thermometer (PL-120 T2, Voltcraft; visual display of T1-T2 temperatures in °C) placed at the manifold, where the water flow was distributed to the glass pipes. Previous measurements have shown that a stationary temperature distribution was reached about 3 s after applying the skin to the pipes.Figure 1


Rumination and interoceptive accuracy predict the occurrence of the thermal grill illusion of pain.

Scheuren R, Sütterlin S, Anton F - BMC Psychol (2014)

Custom-built thermal grill device. W: warm tubes; C: cold tubes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363063&req=5

Fig1: Custom-built thermal grill device. W: warm tubes; C: cold tubes.
Mentions: A custom-built and water-bath driven thermal grill device was used to elicit the paradoxical pain (Curio, I., PhD, Medical Electronics, Bonn/Germany). The thermal grill was composed of eight alternating cold and warm pipes made of borosilicate glass. The glass pipes were spaced at a distance of 7.5 mm by means of separating bars to prevent any ‘mixing phenomenon’ between pipes. The bars were made of 5 mm hollow (thickness 0.5 mm) polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with negligible thermal conductivity. The total surface of the rectangular pipes measured 20 × 10 cm (see Figure 1). The temperatures were regulated with two separate thermoelectric recirculating chillers (T255P, ThermoTek Inc.) delivering the water to the grill pipes through separate flexible and insulated plastic conduits. The flow rate of the pump was 3,86 l/min, approx. 15 ml/s per glass pipe. The volume of one glass pipe was about 16.5 cm3. The fluid content of each pipe was exchanged at a rate of about one second. The fluid temperature was continuously controlled with a digital thermometer (PL-120 T2, Voltcraft; visual display of T1-T2 temperatures in °C) placed at the manifold, where the water flow was distributed to the glass pipes. Previous measurements have shown that a stationary temperature distribution was reached about 3 s after applying the skin to the pipes.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness perceptions were rated on a combined verbal-numerical scale (NRS).Our findings allowed identifying psychological factors substantially involved in the individual pre-disposition to reporting painful sensations in the thermal grill paradigm.These psychological characteristics may also be relevant in the context of central neuropathic pain, which to a large extent incorporates the same neural pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Behaviour, Integrative Research Unit on Social and Individual Development, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg.

ABSTRACT

Background: While the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI) have been thoroughly studied, psychological determinants largely remain unknown. The present study aimed to investigate whether cognitive and affective personality traits encompassing rumination, interoception, and suggestibility may be identified as characteristics favouring the elicitation of paradoxical pain experiences.

Methods: The dominant hand of 54 healthy volunteers was stimulated with a water-bath driven thermal grill providing an interlaced temperature combination of 15 and 41°C. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness perceptions were rated on a combined verbal-numerical scale (NRS). Traits were assessed via questionnaires, the heartbeat-tracking task, and warmth suggestions.

Results: Logistic regression analyses uncovered trait rumination and interoceptive accuracy (IA) as major predictors of the likelihood of the illusive pain occurrence (all p < .05). Rumination and suggestibility had an impact on unpleasant pain perceptions.

Conclusion: Our findings allowed identifying psychological factors substantially involved in the individual pre-disposition to reporting painful sensations in the thermal grill paradigm. These psychological characteristics may also be relevant in the context of central neuropathic pain, which to a large extent incorporates the same neural pathways.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus