Limits...
Volumetric quantification of bone-implant contact using micro-computed tomography analysis based on region-based segmentation.

Kang SW, Lee WJ, Choi SC, Lee SS, Heo MS, Huh KH, Kim TI, Yi WJ - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Two-dimensional (2D) bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were also measured based on the conventional histomorphometric method.VA and VBIC increased significantly with as the healing period increased (p<0.05).VBIC values were significantly correlated with VA values (p<0.05) and with 2D BIC values (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Science Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We have developed a new method of segmenting the areas of absorbable implants and bone using region-based segmentation of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images, which allowed us to quantify volumetric bone-implant contact (VBIC) and volumetric absorption (VA).

Materials and methods: The simple threshold technique generally used in micro-CT analysis cannot be used to segment the areas of absorbable implants and bone. Instead, a region-based segmentation method, a region-labeling method, and subsequent morphological operations were successively applied to micro-CT images. The three-dimensional VBIC and VA of the absorbable implant were then calculated over the entire volume of the implant. Two-dimensional (2D) bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were also measured based on the conventional histomorphometric method.

Results: VA and VBIC increased significantly with as the healing period increased (p<0.05). VBIC values were significantly correlated with VA values (p<0.05) and with 2D BIC values (p<0.05).

Conclusion: It is possible to quantify VBIC and VA for absorbable implants using micro-CT analysis using a region-based segmentation method.

No MeSH data available.


Smoothed micro-computed tomography image of the absorbable implant in axial (A) and coronal (F) slices. Segmented images of the bone in axial (B) and coronal (G) slices. Segmented images of the implant in axial (C) and coronal (H) slices. Hole-filled images of the implant in axial (D) and coronal (I) slices. The implant surface in direct contact with the bone in axial (E) and coronal (J) slices
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362995&req=5

Figure 2: Smoothed micro-computed tomography image of the absorbable implant in axial (A) and coronal (F) slices. Segmented images of the bone in axial (B) and coronal (G) slices. Segmented images of the implant in axial (C) and coronal (H) slices. Hole-filled images of the implant in axial (D) and coronal (I) slices. The implant surface in direct contact with the bone in axial (E) and coronal (J) slices

Mentions: The overall procedure for separating the implant area from the bone area was as follows. First, the reconstructed image was passed through a smoothing process, using a curvature flow filter to reduce the influence of noise (Figs. 2A and F). The images were then segmented into bone and implant areas using an area-based confidence connected segmentation method (Figs. 2B and G).23 After segmenting the implant area, holes were generated inside the implant area (Figs. 2C and H). The holes were filled using a region-labeling method (Figs. 2D and I).24 The boundary between the bone and implant areas was smoothed using the morphological operations of erosion and dilation. If one of the four-connected neighbors of a pixel in the implant area was a bone pixel, that pixel was determined to belong to the area of bone-implant contact (Figs. 2E and J). The segmented areas of the bone and implant underwent 3D reconstruction after all steps of the image processing were applied to the axial slices of the micro-CT images.


Volumetric quantification of bone-implant contact using micro-computed tomography analysis based on region-based segmentation.

Kang SW, Lee WJ, Choi SC, Lee SS, Heo MS, Huh KH, Kim TI, Yi WJ - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Smoothed micro-computed tomography image of the absorbable implant in axial (A) and coronal (F) slices. Segmented images of the bone in axial (B) and coronal (G) slices. Segmented images of the implant in axial (C) and coronal (H) slices. Hole-filled images of the implant in axial (D) and coronal (I) slices. The implant surface in direct contact with the bone in axial (E) and coronal (J) slices
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362995&req=5

Figure 2: Smoothed micro-computed tomography image of the absorbable implant in axial (A) and coronal (F) slices. Segmented images of the bone in axial (B) and coronal (G) slices. Segmented images of the implant in axial (C) and coronal (H) slices. Hole-filled images of the implant in axial (D) and coronal (I) slices. The implant surface in direct contact with the bone in axial (E) and coronal (J) slices
Mentions: The overall procedure for separating the implant area from the bone area was as follows. First, the reconstructed image was passed through a smoothing process, using a curvature flow filter to reduce the influence of noise (Figs. 2A and F). The images were then segmented into bone and implant areas using an area-based confidence connected segmentation method (Figs. 2B and G).23 After segmenting the implant area, holes were generated inside the implant area (Figs. 2C and H). The holes were filled using a region-labeling method (Figs. 2D and I).24 The boundary between the bone and implant areas was smoothed using the morphological operations of erosion and dilation. If one of the four-connected neighbors of a pixel in the implant area was a bone pixel, that pixel was determined to belong to the area of bone-implant contact (Figs. 2E and J). The segmented areas of the bone and implant underwent 3D reconstruction after all steps of the image processing were applied to the axial slices of the micro-CT images.

Bottom Line: Two-dimensional (2D) bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were also measured based on the conventional histomorphometric method.VA and VBIC increased significantly with as the healing period increased (p<0.05).VBIC values were significantly correlated with VA values (p<0.05) and with 2D BIC values (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Science Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We have developed a new method of segmenting the areas of absorbable implants and bone using region-based segmentation of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images, which allowed us to quantify volumetric bone-implant contact (VBIC) and volumetric absorption (VA).

Materials and methods: The simple threshold technique generally used in micro-CT analysis cannot be used to segment the areas of absorbable implants and bone. Instead, a region-based segmentation method, a region-labeling method, and subsequent morphological operations were successively applied to micro-CT images. The three-dimensional VBIC and VA of the absorbable implant were then calculated over the entire volume of the implant. Two-dimensional (2D) bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were also measured based on the conventional histomorphometric method.

Results: VA and VBIC increased significantly with as the healing period increased (p<0.05). VBIC values were significantly correlated with VA values (p<0.05) and with 2D BIC values (p<0.05).

Conclusion: It is possible to quantify VBIC and VA for absorbable implants using micro-CT analysis using a region-based segmentation method.

No MeSH data available.