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Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model.

Kim MS, Kim BY, Choi HY, Choi YJ, Oh SH, Kang JH, Lee SR, Kang JH, Kim GT, Choi YS, Hwang EH - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning.The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures.The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model.

Materials and methods: CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures.

Results: The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures.

Conclusion: Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The photographs show the procedure of an artificial lesion creation in submandibular gland of the rabbit.
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Figure 3: The photographs show the procedure of an artificial lesion creation in submandibular gland of the rabbit.

Mentions: We created an experimental artificial soft tissue lesion model that has never been described previously. No previous model had been used to simulate and investigate soft tissue lesions in the salivary gland for a CBCT study in combination with the evaluation of vascular structures, such as the external carotid artery. The artificial lesions in the salivary gland were created in the submandibular glands (SMGs) of six New Zealand white rabbits, according to the following procedure. A vertical skin incision about 5 cm in length was made and both SMGs were exposed under general anesthesia, which was performed with a subcutaneous injection of ketamine (80 mg/kg body weight) and Xylazine (7 mg/kg body weight). Fatty tissue was obtained from the adjacent fatty space that exists along the neck muscles. The transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland was performed after the incision of the SMGs and suturing using 4-0 absorbable surgical sutures. The skin was then closed using a 3-0 Polysorb running suture (Fig. 3).


Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model.

Kim MS, Kim BY, Choi HY, Choi YJ, Oh SH, Kang JH, Lee SR, Kang JH, Kim GT, Choi YS, Hwang EH - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

The photographs show the procedure of an artificial lesion creation in submandibular gland of the rabbit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362989&req=5

Figure 3: The photographs show the procedure of an artificial lesion creation in submandibular gland of the rabbit.
Mentions: We created an experimental artificial soft tissue lesion model that has never been described previously. No previous model had been used to simulate and investigate soft tissue lesions in the salivary gland for a CBCT study in combination with the evaluation of vascular structures, such as the external carotid artery. The artificial lesions in the salivary gland were created in the submandibular glands (SMGs) of six New Zealand white rabbits, according to the following procedure. A vertical skin incision about 5 cm in length was made and both SMGs were exposed under general anesthesia, which was performed with a subcutaneous injection of ketamine (80 mg/kg body weight) and Xylazine (7 mg/kg body weight). Fatty tissue was obtained from the adjacent fatty space that exists along the neck muscles. The transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland was performed after the incision of the SMGs and suturing using 4-0 absorbable surgical sutures. The skin was then closed using a 3-0 Polysorb running suture (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning.The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures.The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model.

Materials and methods: CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures.

Results: The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures.

Conclusion: Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus