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Nasolacrimal system aeration on computed tomographic imaging: effects of patient positioning and scan orientation.

Czyz CN, Bacon TS, Stacey AW, Cahill EN, Costin BR, Karanfilov BI, Cahill KV - Clin Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: Air was found to be present more fully in the upright-position group as compared with the supine-position group.Comparing axial and coronal scan orientation, no difference in aeration was found, except for the nasolacrimal duct in the upright-position group.Patient position should be accounted for in diagnostic conclusions and treatment decisions based on CT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ohio University/OhioHealth, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the impact of patient positioning and scan orientation on the appearance of air in the nasolacrimal drainage system on computed tomography (CT) imaging, and the repeatability of the observations.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of CT images for 92 patients.

Results: Air was found to be present more fully in the upright-position group as compared with the supine-position group. Comparing axial and coronal scan orientation, no difference in aeration was found, except for the nasolacrimal duct in the upright-position group.

Conclusion: Patient position should be accounted for in diagnostic conclusions and treatment decisions based on CT.

No MeSH data available.


Axial image illustrating a fully opacified (white arrow) and a fully aerated (black arrow) lacrimal sac.
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f1-opth-9-469: Axial image illustrating a fully opacified (white arrow) and a fully aerated (black arrow) lacrimal sac.

Mentions: Scans were independently reviewed by three blinded observers for the presence of air within the NLDS for the right and left sides. If air was present, its location was noted as being in the nasolacrimal sac (NLS) and/or NLD, and further classified as partially or fully aerated (Figures 1–5). “Fully aerated” was applied to describe a continuous column of air filling the entirety of the lumen/sac, thus a fully aerated system was defined as a continuous column of air filling the entirety of the NLD and NLS. The findings were recorded for both coronal and axial images on all 92 patients. This resulted in four independent images per patient reviewed by three independent observers, for a cumulative 1,104 observations.


Nasolacrimal system aeration on computed tomographic imaging: effects of patient positioning and scan orientation.

Czyz CN, Bacon TS, Stacey AW, Cahill EN, Costin BR, Karanfilov BI, Cahill KV - Clin Ophthalmol (2015)

Axial image illustrating a fully opacified (white arrow) and a fully aerated (black arrow) lacrimal sac.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362979&req=5

f1-opth-9-469: Axial image illustrating a fully opacified (white arrow) and a fully aerated (black arrow) lacrimal sac.
Mentions: Scans were independently reviewed by three blinded observers for the presence of air within the NLDS for the right and left sides. If air was present, its location was noted as being in the nasolacrimal sac (NLS) and/or NLD, and further classified as partially or fully aerated (Figures 1–5). “Fully aerated” was applied to describe a continuous column of air filling the entirety of the lumen/sac, thus a fully aerated system was defined as a continuous column of air filling the entirety of the NLD and NLS. The findings were recorded for both coronal and axial images on all 92 patients. This resulted in four independent images per patient reviewed by three independent observers, for a cumulative 1,104 observations.

Bottom Line: Air was found to be present more fully in the upright-position group as compared with the supine-position group.Comparing axial and coronal scan orientation, no difference in aeration was found, except for the nasolacrimal duct in the upright-position group.Patient position should be accounted for in diagnostic conclusions and treatment decisions based on CT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ohio University/OhioHealth, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the impact of patient positioning and scan orientation on the appearance of air in the nasolacrimal drainage system on computed tomography (CT) imaging, and the repeatability of the observations.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of CT images for 92 patients.

Results: Air was found to be present more fully in the upright-position group as compared with the supine-position group. Comparing axial and coronal scan orientation, no difference in aeration was found, except for the nasolacrimal duct in the upright-position group.

Conclusion: Patient position should be accounted for in diagnostic conclusions and treatment decisions based on CT.

No MeSH data available.