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Virtual reality simulation for the optimization of endovascular procedures: current perspectives.

Rudarakanchana N, Van Herzeele I, Desender L, Cheshire NJ - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2015)

Bottom Line: These multidisciplinary interactions lead to challenges that are reflected in the high rate of errors occurring during endovascular procedures.As our understanding of the skills, both technical and nontechnical, required for optimal endovascular performance improves, the requisite tools for objective assessment of these skills are being developed and will further enable the use of VR simulation in the training and assessment of endovascular interventionalists and their entire teams.Simulation training that allows deliberate practice without danger to patients may be key to bridging the gap between new endovascular technology and improved patient outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Imperial College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Endovascular technologies are rapidly evolving, often requiring coordination and cooperation between clinicians and technicians from diverse specialties. These multidisciplinary interactions lead to challenges that are reflected in the high rate of errors occurring during endovascular procedures. Endovascular virtual reality (VR) simulation has evolved from simple benchtop devices to full physic simulators with advanced haptics and dynamic imaging and physiological controls. The latest developments in this field include the use of fully immersive simulated hybrid angiosuites to train whole endovascular teams in crisis resource management and novel technologies that enable practitioners to build VR simulations based on patient-specific anatomy. As our understanding of the skills, both technical and nontechnical, required for optimal endovascular performance improves, the requisite tools for objective assessment of these skills are being developed and will further enable the use of VR simulation in the training and assessment of endovascular interventionalists and their entire teams. Simulation training that allows deliberate practice without danger to patients may be key to bridging the gap between new endovascular technology and improved patient outcomes.

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The contributions of knowledge and technical and nontechnical skills in the development from novice to expert performance.
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f2-vhrm-11-195: The contributions of knowledge and technical and nontechnical skills in the development from novice to expert performance.

Mentions: It has long been recognized that differentiation between novice and expert performance of surgical procedures is based not solely on degrees of technical skill but also, and perhaps more importantly, on proficiency in nontechnical or human factor skills (Figure 2). Thus, although VR simulation training in the context of health care has traditionally focused on the attainment of technical skills, more contemporary advanced practice is turning toward exploiting the potential of fully immersive VR simulators in the training of nontechnical skills and whole teams.18 Although costly, such high-fidelity immersive environments may have advantages over other types of simulation, enabling state-dependent learning with a higher rate of real-world skill transfer.


Virtual reality simulation for the optimization of endovascular procedures: current perspectives.

Rudarakanchana N, Van Herzeele I, Desender L, Cheshire NJ - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2015)

The contributions of knowledge and technical and nontechnical skills in the development from novice to expert performance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362978&req=5

f2-vhrm-11-195: The contributions of knowledge and technical and nontechnical skills in the development from novice to expert performance.
Mentions: It has long been recognized that differentiation between novice and expert performance of surgical procedures is based not solely on degrees of technical skill but also, and perhaps more importantly, on proficiency in nontechnical or human factor skills (Figure 2). Thus, although VR simulation training in the context of health care has traditionally focused on the attainment of technical skills, more contemporary advanced practice is turning toward exploiting the potential of fully immersive VR simulators in the training of nontechnical skills and whole teams.18 Although costly, such high-fidelity immersive environments may have advantages over other types of simulation, enabling state-dependent learning with a higher rate of real-world skill transfer.

Bottom Line: These multidisciplinary interactions lead to challenges that are reflected in the high rate of errors occurring during endovascular procedures.As our understanding of the skills, both technical and nontechnical, required for optimal endovascular performance improves, the requisite tools for objective assessment of these skills are being developed and will further enable the use of VR simulation in the training and assessment of endovascular interventionalists and their entire teams.Simulation training that allows deliberate practice without danger to patients may be key to bridging the gap between new endovascular technology and improved patient outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Imperial College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Endovascular technologies are rapidly evolving, often requiring coordination and cooperation between clinicians and technicians from diverse specialties. These multidisciplinary interactions lead to challenges that are reflected in the high rate of errors occurring during endovascular procedures. Endovascular virtual reality (VR) simulation has evolved from simple benchtop devices to full physic simulators with advanced haptics and dynamic imaging and physiological controls. The latest developments in this field include the use of fully immersive simulated hybrid angiosuites to train whole endovascular teams in crisis resource management and novel technologies that enable practitioners to build VR simulations based on patient-specific anatomy. As our understanding of the skills, both technical and nontechnical, required for optimal endovascular performance improves, the requisite tools for objective assessment of these skills are being developed and will further enable the use of VR simulation in the training and assessment of endovascular interventionalists and their entire teams. Simulation training that allows deliberate practice without danger to patients may be key to bridging the gap between new endovascular technology and improved patient outcomes.

Show MeSH