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Impact of incarceration in Nazi concentration camps on multimorbidity of former prisoners.

Jablonski RK, Leszek J, Rosińczuk J, Uchmanowicz I, Panaszek B - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2015)

Bottom Line: Thirty years after leaving a camp, the most prevalent coexisting conditions were also found within the CNS (80%), cardiovascular system (58.33%), and skeletal system (55%).Five and 30 years after leaving a camp, multiorgan lesions were found in 21.6% and 60% of survivors, respectively.The rate of CNS diseases was four times higher, and the rate of cardiovascular diseases or skeletal system dysfunctions was two times higher, in the study group after 30 years of leaving a camp compared with the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatry and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To show the extent to which the health of former prisoners was affected by incarceration in extermination camps after 5 and 30 years of leaving the camp, and to determine the etiological factors underlying particular dysfunctions.

Methods: Medical records of former prisoners developed in 1950 (n=250) and 1975 (n=120) were then, after several decades, retrospectively analyzed and compared with the control group, randomized and matched according to age, sex, occupation, and environment. None of the subjects in the control group was a prisoner either at a concentration camp or at any other prison or detention facility.

Results: Multimorbidity affected mainly the central nervous system (CNS). Five years after leaving a camp, CNS dysfunctions were observed in 66% of former prisoners. Skeletal (42.4%) and cardiovascular system (34.4%) dysfunctions were the second and third most frequent dysfunctions. Thirty years after leaving a camp, the most prevalent coexisting conditions were also found within the CNS (80%), cardiovascular system (58.33%), and skeletal system (55%). Five and 30 years after leaving a camp, multiorgan lesions were found in 21.6% and 60% of survivors, respectively. Multimorbidity was more frequent in a group of prisoners who underwent the state of apathy and depression or who had been incarcerated longer than 24 months. The rate of CNS diseases was four times higher, and the rate of cardiovascular diseases or skeletal system dysfunctions was two times higher, in the study group after 30 years of leaving a camp compared with the control group.

Conclusion: The consequences of incarceration in concentration camps manifesting as multimorbidity, premature aging, and dramatic increase in mortality rate are observed in the majority of former prisoners. The multimorbidity mostly affected older prisoners who stayed at a camp for a longer time period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Morbidity in the group of prisoners evaluated in 1975.
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f2-ndt-11-669: Morbidity in the group of prisoners evaluated in 1975.

Mentions: On the basis of questionnaires and comparative analysis of the study group and control group, the condition of 120 former prisoners deteriorated substantially within 30 years after leaving the camp. This was due to the extreme conditions at the camps, famine, contagious diseases (mainly typhus and typhoid fever), injuries (mainly head injury), beating and torture, and pseudo-medical experiments, whose effects often became visible many years later. Lesions affected almost all systems. However, the most common were dysfunctions within the CNS, which manifested in 80% of survivors, including anxiety neurosis, depressive and vegetative neurosis, anxiety-depressive disorder, and depression. Furthermore, single cases of psychosis, posttraumatic epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia were reported. In the control group, only 24% of subjects manifested some lesions. Cardiovascular and skeletal system dysfunctions were the second and third most frequent dysfunctions manifested by former prisoners (respectively, 58.3% versus 35% in the control group, and 55% versus 26.6% in the control group). Less predominant than the three systems mentioned above were lesions of the respiratory system (25% versus 15.8% in the control group), alimentary system (20% versus 14.1% in the control group), urinary system (13.3% versus 8.3% in the control group), and vision and hearing (17.5% versus 8.3% in the control group). Posttraumatic lesions were also very common and affected 48.4% of former prisoners but only 4.1% in the control group. More details about the percentage of lesions within the particular systems (multimorbidity) in former prisoners of concentration camps compared with the control group are shown in Figure 2.


Impact of incarceration in Nazi concentration camps on multimorbidity of former prisoners.

Jablonski RK, Leszek J, Rosińczuk J, Uchmanowicz I, Panaszek B - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2015)

Morbidity in the group of prisoners evaluated in 1975.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362975&req=5

f2-ndt-11-669: Morbidity in the group of prisoners evaluated in 1975.
Mentions: On the basis of questionnaires and comparative analysis of the study group and control group, the condition of 120 former prisoners deteriorated substantially within 30 years after leaving the camp. This was due to the extreme conditions at the camps, famine, contagious diseases (mainly typhus and typhoid fever), injuries (mainly head injury), beating and torture, and pseudo-medical experiments, whose effects often became visible many years later. Lesions affected almost all systems. However, the most common were dysfunctions within the CNS, which manifested in 80% of survivors, including anxiety neurosis, depressive and vegetative neurosis, anxiety-depressive disorder, and depression. Furthermore, single cases of psychosis, posttraumatic epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia were reported. In the control group, only 24% of subjects manifested some lesions. Cardiovascular and skeletal system dysfunctions were the second and third most frequent dysfunctions manifested by former prisoners (respectively, 58.3% versus 35% in the control group, and 55% versus 26.6% in the control group). Less predominant than the three systems mentioned above were lesions of the respiratory system (25% versus 15.8% in the control group), alimentary system (20% versus 14.1% in the control group), urinary system (13.3% versus 8.3% in the control group), and vision and hearing (17.5% versus 8.3% in the control group). Posttraumatic lesions were also very common and affected 48.4% of former prisoners but only 4.1% in the control group. More details about the percentage of lesions within the particular systems (multimorbidity) in former prisoners of concentration camps compared with the control group are shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Thirty years after leaving a camp, the most prevalent coexisting conditions were also found within the CNS (80%), cardiovascular system (58.33%), and skeletal system (55%).Five and 30 years after leaving a camp, multiorgan lesions were found in 21.6% and 60% of survivors, respectively.The rate of CNS diseases was four times higher, and the rate of cardiovascular diseases or skeletal system dysfunctions was two times higher, in the study group after 30 years of leaving a camp compared with the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatry and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To show the extent to which the health of former prisoners was affected by incarceration in extermination camps after 5 and 30 years of leaving the camp, and to determine the etiological factors underlying particular dysfunctions.

Methods: Medical records of former prisoners developed in 1950 (n=250) and 1975 (n=120) were then, after several decades, retrospectively analyzed and compared with the control group, randomized and matched according to age, sex, occupation, and environment. None of the subjects in the control group was a prisoner either at a concentration camp or at any other prison or detention facility.

Results: Multimorbidity affected mainly the central nervous system (CNS). Five years after leaving a camp, CNS dysfunctions were observed in 66% of former prisoners. Skeletal (42.4%) and cardiovascular system (34.4%) dysfunctions were the second and third most frequent dysfunctions. Thirty years after leaving a camp, the most prevalent coexisting conditions were also found within the CNS (80%), cardiovascular system (58.33%), and skeletal system (55%). Five and 30 years after leaving a camp, multiorgan lesions were found in 21.6% and 60% of survivors, respectively. Multimorbidity was more frequent in a group of prisoners who underwent the state of apathy and depression or who had been incarcerated longer than 24 months. The rate of CNS diseases was four times higher, and the rate of cardiovascular diseases or skeletal system dysfunctions was two times higher, in the study group after 30 years of leaving a camp compared with the control group.

Conclusion: The consequences of incarceration in concentration camps manifesting as multimorbidity, premature aging, and dramatic increase in mortality rate are observed in the majority of former prisoners. The multimorbidity mostly affected older prisoners who stayed at a camp for a longer time period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus