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Anticoccidial and antioxidant activities of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Eimeria papillata-induced infection in the jejunum.

Dkhil MA, Al-Quraishy S, Wahab R - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: This output was significantly decreased, to 12.5×10(3)±1,000 oocysts, in mice treated with ZNPs.This was evidenced (1) through an increase in the inflammatory histological score, (2) through increased production of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, and (3) through a decrease in both the glutathione level and goblet cell number in mice jejuna.Our results indicate, therefore, that ZNPs have protective effects against E. papillata-induced coccidiosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia ; Department of Zoology and Entomology, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has recently emerged as a better option for the treatment of various diseases. Here, we investigated the in vivo anticoccidial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs). ZNPs were crystalline in nature, with a smooth and spherical surface and a diameter in the range of ~10-15 nm. The X-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to identify the crystalline property of the grown ZNPs, whereas field emission scanning electron microscopy was employed to check the size and morphology of the ZNPs. The data showed that mice infected with Eimeria papillata produced 29.7×10(3)±1,500 oocysts/g feces on day 5 postinfection. This output was significantly decreased, to 12.5×10(3)±1,000 oocysts, in mice treated with ZNPs. Infection also induced inflammation and injury of the jejunum. This was evidenced (1) through an increase in the inflammatory histological score, (2) through increased production of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, and (3) through a decrease in both the glutathione level and goblet cell number in mice jejuna. All these infection-induced parameters were significantly altered during treatment with ZNPs. Our results indicate, therefore, that ZNPs have protective effects against E. papillata-induced coccidiosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of ZNPs on Eimeria papillata-induced jejunum injury on day 5. (A) Noninfected jejunum with normal architecture of the absorptive epithelium and lamina propria. (B) Infected jejunum with some pathological changes in lamina propria and absorptive epithelia. Developmental stages appearing in the absorptive epithelia. (C) Infected treated mouse exhibiting fewer parasites.Notes: Sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Bar =25 μm.Abbreviation: ZNP, zinc oxide nanoparticle.
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f3-ijn-10-1961: Effect of ZNPs on Eimeria papillata-induced jejunum injury on day 5. (A) Noninfected jejunum with normal architecture of the absorptive epithelium and lamina propria. (B) Infected jejunum with some pathological changes in lamina propria and absorptive epithelia. Developmental stages appearing in the absorptive epithelia. (C) Infected treated mouse exhibiting fewer parasites.Notes: Sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Bar =25 μm.Abbreviation: ZNP, zinc oxide nanoparticle.

Mentions: Through examination of the hematoxylin–eosin sections, it was clear that E. papillata induced remarkable histopathological changes in the infected jejunum. In addition, many developmental stages of the parasite were prominent in the jejuna villi (Figure 3). Figure 4 shows that the infected mice appeared to have moderate inflammatory injury, which accords with the work of Dommels et al.13 This injury was diminished when mice were treated with ZNPs. Also, the E. papillata-infected mice jejuna appeared to contain a smaller number of developmental stages when treated with ZNPs (Figures 3 and 4).


Anticoccidial and antioxidant activities of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Eimeria papillata-induced infection in the jejunum.

Dkhil MA, Al-Quraishy S, Wahab R - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Effect of ZNPs on Eimeria papillata-induced jejunum injury on day 5. (A) Noninfected jejunum with normal architecture of the absorptive epithelium and lamina propria. (B) Infected jejunum with some pathological changes in lamina propria and absorptive epithelia. Developmental stages appearing in the absorptive epithelia. (C) Infected treated mouse exhibiting fewer parasites.Notes: Sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Bar =25 μm.Abbreviation: ZNP, zinc oxide nanoparticle.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362905&req=5

f3-ijn-10-1961: Effect of ZNPs on Eimeria papillata-induced jejunum injury on day 5. (A) Noninfected jejunum with normal architecture of the absorptive epithelium and lamina propria. (B) Infected jejunum with some pathological changes in lamina propria and absorptive epithelia. Developmental stages appearing in the absorptive epithelia. (C) Infected treated mouse exhibiting fewer parasites.Notes: Sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Bar =25 μm.Abbreviation: ZNP, zinc oxide nanoparticle.
Mentions: Through examination of the hematoxylin–eosin sections, it was clear that E. papillata induced remarkable histopathological changes in the infected jejunum. In addition, many developmental stages of the parasite were prominent in the jejuna villi (Figure 3). Figure 4 shows that the infected mice appeared to have moderate inflammatory injury, which accords with the work of Dommels et al.13 This injury was diminished when mice were treated with ZNPs. Also, the E. papillata-infected mice jejuna appeared to contain a smaller number of developmental stages when treated with ZNPs (Figures 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: This output was significantly decreased, to 12.5×10(3)±1,000 oocysts, in mice treated with ZNPs.This was evidenced (1) through an increase in the inflammatory histological score, (2) through increased production of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, and (3) through a decrease in both the glutathione level and goblet cell number in mice jejuna.Our results indicate, therefore, that ZNPs have protective effects against E. papillata-induced coccidiosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia ; Department of Zoology and Entomology, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has recently emerged as a better option for the treatment of various diseases. Here, we investigated the in vivo anticoccidial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs). ZNPs were crystalline in nature, with a smooth and spherical surface and a diameter in the range of ~10-15 nm. The X-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to identify the crystalline property of the grown ZNPs, whereas field emission scanning electron microscopy was employed to check the size and morphology of the ZNPs. The data showed that mice infected with Eimeria papillata produced 29.7×10(3)±1,500 oocysts/g feces on day 5 postinfection. This output was significantly decreased, to 12.5×10(3)±1,000 oocysts, in mice treated with ZNPs. Infection also induced inflammation and injury of the jejunum. This was evidenced (1) through an increase in the inflammatory histological score, (2) through increased production of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, and (3) through a decrease in both the glutathione level and goblet cell number in mice jejuna. All these infection-induced parameters were significantly altered during treatment with ZNPs. Our results indicate, therefore, that ZNPs have protective effects against E. papillata-induced coccidiosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus