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Sunroot mediated synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles and evaluation of its antibacterial and rat splenocyte cytotoxic effects.

Aravinthan A, Govarthanan M, Selvam K, Praburaman L, Selvankumar T, Balamurugan R, Kamala-Kannan S, Kim JH - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: The AgNPs (1-4 mM) extensively reduced the growth rate of the phytopathogens.In addition, the cytotoxic effect of the synthesized AgNPs was analyzed using rat splenocytes.The cell viability was decreased according to the increasing concentration of AgNPs and 67% of cell death was observed at 100 μg/mL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Biosafety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
A rapid, green phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the aqueous extract of Helianthus tuberosus (sunroot tuber) was reported in this study. The morphology of the AgNPs was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis revealed that biomolecules in the tuber extract were involved in the reduction and capping of AgNPs. The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the AgNPs, using an energy range of 2-4 keV, confirmed the presence of elemental silver without any contamination. Further, the synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against phytopathogens such as Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas axonopodis. The AgNPs (1-4 mM) extensively reduced the growth rate of the phytopathogens. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of the synthesized AgNPs was analyzed using rat splenocytes. The cell viability was decreased according to the increasing concentration of AgNPs and 67% of cell death was observed at 100 μg/mL.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of AgNPs on growth of phytopathogenic bacteria.Notes: (A) Ralstonia solanacearum and (B) Xanthomonas axonopodis.Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.
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f6-ijn-10-1977: Effect of AgNPs on growth of phytopathogenic bacteria.Notes: (A) Ralstonia solanacearum and (B) Xanthomonas axonopodis.Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.

Mentions: Numerous studies reported that biologically synthesized AgNPs have significant antibacterial and antifungal activities, and could be used for the treatment of bacterial and fungal diseases in biotic communities.7,8 However, the adverse effects of AgNPs need to be carefully evaluated before they could be used in antimicrobial products. Hence, phytosynthesized AgNPs were studied for antibacterial activity against phytopathogenic bacteria, namely, R. solanacearum and X. axonopodis. The bacterial growth measurements at different concentrations (1–4 mM) of the AgNPs were determined 0–24 hours at regular time intervals (Figure 6A and B). The observed results indicated that 4 mM concentrations of the AgNPs effectively encountered the bacterial population in the medium. The results are consistent with our previous study reporting the antibacterial activity of AgNPs against antibiotic resistant strains.7


Sunroot mediated synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles and evaluation of its antibacterial and rat splenocyte cytotoxic effects.

Aravinthan A, Govarthanan M, Selvam K, Praburaman L, Selvankumar T, Balamurugan R, Kamala-Kannan S, Kim JH - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Effect of AgNPs on growth of phytopathogenic bacteria.Notes: (A) Ralstonia solanacearum and (B) Xanthomonas axonopodis.Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362901&req=5

f6-ijn-10-1977: Effect of AgNPs on growth of phytopathogenic bacteria.Notes: (A) Ralstonia solanacearum and (B) Xanthomonas axonopodis.Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.
Mentions: Numerous studies reported that biologically synthesized AgNPs have significant antibacterial and antifungal activities, and could be used for the treatment of bacterial and fungal diseases in biotic communities.7,8 However, the adverse effects of AgNPs need to be carefully evaluated before they could be used in antimicrobial products. Hence, phytosynthesized AgNPs were studied for antibacterial activity against phytopathogenic bacteria, namely, R. solanacearum and X. axonopodis. The bacterial growth measurements at different concentrations (1–4 mM) of the AgNPs were determined 0–24 hours at regular time intervals (Figure 6A and B). The observed results indicated that 4 mM concentrations of the AgNPs effectively encountered the bacterial population in the medium. The results are consistent with our previous study reporting the antibacterial activity of AgNPs against antibiotic resistant strains.7

Bottom Line: The AgNPs (1-4 mM) extensively reduced the growth rate of the phytopathogens.In addition, the cytotoxic effect of the synthesized AgNPs was analyzed using rat splenocytes.The cell viability was decreased according to the increasing concentration of AgNPs and 67% of cell death was observed at 100 μg/mL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Biosafety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
A rapid, green phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the aqueous extract of Helianthus tuberosus (sunroot tuber) was reported in this study. The morphology of the AgNPs was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis revealed that biomolecules in the tuber extract were involved in the reduction and capping of AgNPs. The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the AgNPs, using an energy range of 2-4 keV, confirmed the presence of elemental silver without any contamination. Further, the synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against phytopathogens such as Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas axonopodis. The AgNPs (1-4 mM) extensively reduced the growth rate of the phytopathogens. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of the synthesized AgNPs was analyzed using rat splenocytes. The cell viability was decreased according to the increasing concentration of AgNPs and 67% of cell death was observed at 100 μg/mL.

No MeSH data available.