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Differences in early and late stages of information processing between slow versus fast participants.

Portella C, Machado S, Paes F, Cagy M, Sack AT, Sandoval-Carrillo A, Salas-Pacheco J, Silva AC, Piedade R, Ribeiro P, Nardi AE, Arias-Carrión O - Int Arch Med (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components.Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants.In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping and Sensory Motor Integration, Institute of Psychiatry of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (IPUB/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ; UNIABEU/Fisioterapia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The human brain is a system consisting of various interconnected neural networks, with functional specialization coexisting with functional integration occurring both; temporally and spatially at many levels. The current study ranked and compared fast and slow participants in processing information by assessing latency and amplitude of early and late Event-Related Potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, Premotor Potential (PMP) and P300. In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components. For this purpose, twenty right-handed and healthy individuals were subjected to a classical ERP "Oddball" paradigm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function analyses (DFA) used PRE components and the Reaction Time (RT) to classify individuals. Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants. In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants. Based on these findings, we suggest that the ERP is able to detect even minimal impairments, in the processing of somatosensory information and cognitive and motor stages. Hence, the study of ERP might also be capable of assessing sensorimotor dysfunctions in healthy old-aged people and in neuropsychiatric patients (suffering from dementia, Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Event-related potential plot for P200, N200, PMP and P300 waves. A) Event-related potential plot for P200 wave between fast and slow groups; B) Event-related potential plot for N200 wave between fast and slow groups; C) Event-related potential plot for PMP wave between fast and slow groups; D) Event-related potential plot for P300 wave between fast and slow groups.
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Fig2: Event-related potential plot for P200, N200, PMP and P300 waves. A) Event-related potential plot for P200 wave between fast and slow groups; B) Event-related potential plot for N200 wave between fast and slow groups; C) Event-related potential plot for PMP wave between fast and slow groups; D) Event-related potential plot for P300 wave between fast and slow groups.

Mentions: Statistical analysis revealed that the latency of the P200 component (observed in electrode O2) of the fast group was significantly reduced when compared to the slow group (p = 0.015; mean fast = 192.500, SD fast = 27.301; mean slow = 213.4375, SD slow = 31.075) (Figures 1B, 2A and 3A). In contrast, the amplitude of the P200 component (observed in electrode O2) of the fast group was significantly increased when compared to the slow group (p = 0.008; mean fast = 12.466, SD fast = 5.460; mean slow = 6.425, SD slow = 2.143) (Figure 1C).Figure 2


Differences in early and late stages of information processing between slow versus fast participants.

Portella C, Machado S, Paes F, Cagy M, Sack AT, Sandoval-Carrillo A, Salas-Pacheco J, Silva AC, Piedade R, Ribeiro P, Nardi AE, Arias-Carrión O - Int Arch Med (2014)

Event-related potential plot for P200, N200, PMP and P300 waves. A) Event-related potential plot for P200 wave between fast and slow groups; B) Event-related potential plot for N200 wave between fast and slow groups; C) Event-related potential plot for PMP wave between fast and slow groups; D) Event-related potential plot for P300 wave between fast and slow groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362839&req=5

Fig2: Event-related potential plot for P200, N200, PMP and P300 waves. A) Event-related potential plot for P200 wave between fast and slow groups; B) Event-related potential plot for N200 wave between fast and slow groups; C) Event-related potential plot for PMP wave between fast and slow groups; D) Event-related potential plot for P300 wave between fast and slow groups.
Mentions: Statistical analysis revealed that the latency of the P200 component (observed in electrode O2) of the fast group was significantly reduced when compared to the slow group (p = 0.015; mean fast = 192.500, SD fast = 27.301; mean slow = 213.4375, SD slow = 31.075) (Figures 1B, 2A and 3A). In contrast, the amplitude of the P200 component (observed in electrode O2) of the fast group was significantly increased when compared to the slow group (p = 0.008; mean fast = 12.466, SD fast = 5.460; mean slow = 6.425, SD slow = 2.143) (Figure 1C).Figure 2

Bottom Line: In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components.Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants.In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping and Sensory Motor Integration, Institute of Psychiatry of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (IPUB/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ; UNIABEU/Fisioterapia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The human brain is a system consisting of various interconnected neural networks, with functional specialization coexisting with functional integration occurring both; temporally and spatially at many levels. The current study ranked and compared fast and slow participants in processing information by assessing latency and amplitude of early and late Event-Related Potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, Premotor Potential (PMP) and P300. In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components. For this purpose, twenty right-handed and healthy individuals were subjected to a classical ERP "Oddball" paradigm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function analyses (DFA) used PRE components and the Reaction Time (RT) to classify individuals. Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants. In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants. Based on these findings, we suggest that the ERP is able to detect even minimal impairments, in the processing of somatosensory information and cognitive and motor stages. Hence, the study of ERP might also be capable of assessing sensorimotor dysfunctions in healthy old-aged people and in neuropsychiatric patients (suffering from dementia, Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus