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In vitro gastrointestinal digestion study of two wheat cultivars and evaluation of xylanase supplementation.

Lafond M, Bouza B, Eyrichine S, Rouffineau F, Saulnier L, Giardina T, Bonnin E, Preynat A - J Anim Sci Biotechnol (2015)

Bottom Line: In order to appreciate their in vivo mode of action, the supplementation effect of two of its xylanases, XynD and XynB from families GH10 and GH11 respectively, have been evaluated on two different wheat cultivars Caphorn and Isengrain, which were chosen amongst 6 varieties for their difference in non starch polysaccharides content and arabinoxylan composition.Polysaccharide degradation appeared to occur mainly at the jejunal level and was higher with Isengrain than with Caphorn.For both cultivars, XynD and XynB supplementation increased notably the amount of reducing end sugars into the jejuno-ileal dialysates, which has been confirmed by a valuable increase of the soluble glucose into the jejunal dialysates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: iSm2 - BiosCiences UMR 7313, Aix Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, CNRS, Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: The filamentous fungus Talaromyces versatilis is known to improve the metabolizable energy of wheat-based poultry diets thanks to its ability to produce a pool of CAZymes and particularly endo-β(1,4)-xylanases. In order to appreciate their in vivo mode of action, the supplementation effect of two of its xylanases, XynD and XynB from families GH10 and GH11 respectively, have been evaluated on two different wheat cultivars Caphorn and Isengrain, which were chosen amongst 6 varieties for their difference in non starch polysaccharides content and arabinoxylan composition.

Results: Polysaccharides digestion was followed during 6 h along the digestive tract using the TNO gastrointestinal model-1, to mimic monogastric metabolism. Polysaccharide degradation appeared to occur mainly at the jejunal level and was higher with Isengrain than with Caphorn. For both cultivars, XynD and XynB supplementation increased notably the amount of reducing end sugars into the jejuno-ileal dialysates, which has been confirmed by a valuable increase of the soluble glucose into the jejunal dialysates.

Conclusions: The amounts of arabinose and xylose into the dialysates and ileal deliveries increased consequently mainly for Caphorn, suggesting that XynD and XynB supplementation in wheat-based diet could alleviate the anti-nutritional effects of arabinoxylans by limiting the physical entrapment of starch and could increase the available metabolizable energy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram of the gastrointestinal 1 digestion model (TIM-1).
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Fig1: Schematic diagram of the gastrointestinal 1 digestion model (TIM-1).

Mentions: The digestion assays were carried out on the TIM-1 developed at the TNO (Nederlandse Organisatie voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek) [21] (Figure 1). This in vitro model allows control of digestive secretions, pH, temperature and endogenous enzymes and mimics the gut peristalsis. The protocol of Minekus, adapted for pigs, was used along with some modifications to mimic poultry digestion [21]. The pH for the duodenal, jejunal and ileal compartments were adjusted at 6.5, 6.8 and 7.2, respectively. Before starting the incubation, the duodenal compartment was flushed with approximately 61 g of the duodenal salt solution described previously. The jejunal and ileal compartments were filled with 130 mL of the small-intestinal salt solution. The intestinal absorption was mimicked using haemodialyser HG-400 membranes with a molecular weight cut-off range of 5–10 kDa (Hospal Cobe, Lyon, France). The dialysis fluid was pumped at 10 mL/min and collected in the intervals 0–60, 60–120, 120–180, 180–240, and 240–360 min. The ileal effluents were collected between 0–120, 120–180, 180–240, and 240–360 min.Figure 1


In vitro gastrointestinal digestion study of two wheat cultivars and evaluation of xylanase supplementation.

Lafond M, Bouza B, Eyrichine S, Rouffineau F, Saulnier L, Giardina T, Bonnin E, Preynat A - J Anim Sci Biotechnol (2015)

Schematic diagram of the gastrointestinal 1 digestion model (TIM-1).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362821&req=5

Fig1: Schematic diagram of the gastrointestinal 1 digestion model (TIM-1).
Mentions: The digestion assays were carried out on the TIM-1 developed at the TNO (Nederlandse Organisatie voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek) [21] (Figure 1). This in vitro model allows control of digestive secretions, pH, temperature and endogenous enzymes and mimics the gut peristalsis. The protocol of Minekus, adapted for pigs, was used along with some modifications to mimic poultry digestion [21]. The pH for the duodenal, jejunal and ileal compartments were adjusted at 6.5, 6.8 and 7.2, respectively. Before starting the incubation, the duodenal compartment was flushed with approximately 61 g of the duodenal salt solution described previously. The jejunal and ileal compartments were filled with 130 mL of the small-intestinal salt solution. The intestinal absorption was mimicked using haemodialyser HG-400 membranes with a molecular weight cut-off range of 5–10 kDa (Hospal Cobe, Lyon, France). The dialysis fluid was pumped at 10 mL/min and collected in the intervals 0–60, 60–120, 120–180, 180–240, and 240–360 min. The ileal effluents were collected between 0–120, 120–180, 180–240, and 240–360 min.Figure 1

Bottom Line: In order to appreciate their in vivo mode of action, the supplementation effect of two of its xylanases, XynD and XynB from families GH10 and GH11 respectively, have been evaluated on two different wheat cultivars Caphorn and Isengrain, which were chosen amongst 6 varieties for their difference in non starch polysaccharides content and arabinoxylan composition.Polysaccharide degradation appeared to occur mainly at the jejunal level and was higher with Isengrain than with Caphorn.For both cultivars, XynD and XynB supplementation increased notably the amount of reducing end sugars into the jejuno-ileal dialysates, which has been confirmed by a valuable increase of the soluble glucose into the jejunal dialysates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: iSm2 - BiosCiences UMR 7313, Aix Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, CNRS, Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: The filamentous fungus Talaromyces versatilis is known to improve the metabolizable energy of wheat-based poultry diets thanks to its ability to produce a pool of CAZymes and particularly endo-β(1,4)-xylanases. In order to appreciate their in vivo mode of action, the supplementation effect of two of its xylanases, XynD and XynB from families GH10 and GH11 respectively, have been evaluated on two different wheat cultivars Caphorn and Isengrain, which were chosen amongst 6 varieties for their difference in non starch polysaccharides content and arabinoxylan composition.

Results: Polysaccharides digestion was followed during 6 h along the digestive tract using the TNO gastrointestinal model-1, to mimic monogastric metabolism. Polysaccharide degradation appeared to occur mainly at the jejunal level and was higher with Isengrain than with Caphorn. For both cultivars, XynD and XynB supplementation increased notably the amount of reducing end sugars into the jejuno-ileal dialysates, which has been confirmed by a valuable increase of the soluble glucose into the jejunal dialysates.

Conclusions: The amounts of arabinose and xylose into the dialysates and ileal deliveries increased consequently mainly for Caphorn, suggesting that XynD and XynB supplementation in wheat-based diet could alleviate the anti-nutritional effects of arabinoxylans by limiting the physical entrapment of starch and could increase the available metabolizable energy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus