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Effects of dietary pantothenic acid on growth, intestinal function, anti-oxidative status and fatty acids synthesis of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

Qian Y, Li XF, Zhang DD, Cai DS, Tian HY, Liu WB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content.The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased.Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Four groups of juvenile Megalobrama amblycephala were fed three times daily with six semi-purified diets containing 3.39 (PA unsupplied diet), 10.54, 19.28, 31.04, 48.38 and 59.72 mg kg(-1) calcium D-pantothenate. The results showed that survival rate, final weight, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen retention efficiency all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg(-1), whereas the opposite was true for feed conversion ratio. Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content. Intestinal α-amylase, lipase, protease, Na+-K+-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities were all elevated in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic catalase activities improved with increases in dietary PA, while the opposite was true for malondialdehyde contents. The liver PA concentration and coenzyme A content rose significantly (P<0.01), up to 31.04 mg kg(-1), with increasing dietary PA levels and then plateaued. The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased. Fish fed diets containing 19.28 and 31.04 mg kg(-1) PA exhibited higher (P<0.01) docosahexaenoic acid and PUFA percentages in muscle than those fed with other diets. The expression of the gene encoding pantothenate kinase was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1). Based on broken-line regression analyses of weight gain, liver CoA concentrations and PA contents against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA requirements of juvenile blunt snout bream were estimated to be 24.08 mg kg(-1).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between dietary PA levels and hepatic PA concentration (μg g-1 tissue) of juvenile blunt snout bream.
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pone.0119518.g002: Relationship between dietary PA levels and hepatic PA concentration (μg g-1 tissue) of juvenile blunt snout bream.

Mentions: The liver CoA and PA contents of juvenile blunt snout bream fed different dietary PA levels was shown in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3. The liver CoA concentration increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg-1 but showed no additional significant differences (P>0.05) with further increases in dietary PA levels. The liver PA concentration also rose significantly as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg-1, then displayed a plateau up to 59.72 mg kg-1. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of liver CoA and PA concentrations against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA levels for juvenile blunt snout bream were estimated to be 24.08 and 25.68 mg kg-1, respectively.


Effects of dietary pantothenic acid on growth, intestinal function, anti-oxidative status and fatty acids synthesis of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

Qian Y, Li XF, Zhang DD, Cai DS, Tian HY, Liu WB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between dietary PA levels and hepatic PA concentration (μg g-1 tissue) of juvenile blunt snout bream.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362765&req=5

pone.0119518.g002: Relationship between dietary PA levels and hepatic PA concentration (μg g-1 tissue) of juvenile blunt snout bream.
Mentions: The liver CoA and PA contents of juvenile blunt snout bream fed different dietary PA levels was shown in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3. The liver CoA concentration increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg-1 but showed no additional significant differences (P>0.05) with further increases in dietary PA levels. The liver PA concentration also rose significantly as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg-1, then displayed a plateau up to 59.72 mg kg-1. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of liver CoA and PA concentrations against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA levels for juvenile blunt snout bream were estimated to be 24.08 and 25.68 mg kg-1, respectively.

Bottom Line: Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content.The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased.Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Four groups of juvenile Megalobrama amblycephala were fed three times daily with six semi-purified diets containing 3.39 (PA unsupplied diet), 10.54, 19.28, 31.04, 48.38 and 59.72 mg kg(-1) calcium D-pantothenate. The results showed that survival rate, final weight, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen retention efficiency all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg(-1), whereas the opposite was true for feed conversion ratio. Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content. Intestinal α-amylase, lipase, protease, Na+-K+-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities were all elevated in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic catalase activities improved with increases in dietary PA, while the opposite was true for malondialdehyde contents. The liver PA concentration and coenzyme A content rose significantly (P<0.01), up to 31.04 mg kg(-1), with increasing dietary PA levels and then plateaued. The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased. Fish fed diets containing 19.28 and 31.04 mg kg(-1) PA exhibited higher (P<0.01) docosahexaenoic acid and PUFA percentages in muscle than those fed with other diets. The expression of the gene encoding pantothenate kinase was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1). Based on broken-line regression analyses of weight gain, liver CoA concentrations and PA contents against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA requirements of juvenile blunt snout bream were estimated to be 24.08 mg kg(-1).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus