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Prevalence and diversity of small mammal-associated Bartonella species in rural and urban Kenya.

Halliday JE, Knobel DL, Agwanda B, Bai Y, Breiman RF, Cleaveland S, Njenga MK, Kosoy M - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Several rodent-associated Bartonella species are human pathogens but little is known about their epidemiology.In Kibera, 60% of Rattus rattus were positive, as compared to 13% in Asembo.Acute febrile illness occurs at high incidence in both Asembo and Kibera but the etiology of many of these illnesses is unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Several rodent-associated Bartonella species are human pathogens but little is known about their epidemiology. We trapped rodents and shrews around human habitations at two sites in Kenya (rural Asembo and urban Kibera) to determine the prevalence of Bartonella infection. Bartonella were detected by culture in five of seven host species. In Kibera, 60% of Rattus rattus were positive, as compared to 13% in Asembo. Bartonella were also detected in C. olivieri (7%), Lemniscomys striatus (50%), Mastomys natalensis (43%) and R. norvegicus (50%). Partial sequencing of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene of isolates showed that Kibera strains were similar to reference isolates from Rattus trapped in Asia, America, and Europe, but that most strains from Asembo were less similar. Host species and trapping location were associated with differences in infection status but there was no evidence of associations between host age or sex and infection status. Acute febrile illness occurs at high incidence in both Asembo and Kibera but the etiology of many of these illnesses is unknown. Bartonella similar to known human pathogens were detected in small mammals at both sites and investigation of the ecological determinants of host infection status and of the public health significance of Bartonella infections at these locations is warranted.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map and summary of rodent trapping sites in Kibera.Summary of the rodents trapped and Bartonella isolates obtained within different trapping zones (A to E) at the Kibera study site.
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pntd.0003608.g002: Map and summary of rodent trapping sites in Kibera.Summary of the rodents trapped and Bartonella isolates obtained within different trapping zones (A to E) at the Kibera study site.

Mentions: In Asembo, trapping was conducted over the period of July—August 2009. Traps were placed at 50 compounds that were a randomly selected subset of livestock-owning compounds enrolled in a larger study of zoonoses epidemiology [26]. Within each selected compound, five or six medium-sized foldable Sherman traps (H.B. Sherman Traps Inc., Tallahassee, FL) were placed for three or four nights. Traps were placed in three categories of habitat: within occupied dwellings; within outbuildings, which included unoccupied dwellings, stores, latrines or kitchens separate from the main dwelling; and outside, in areas within the compound yard. In Kibera, trapping was conducted over the period of September—November 2008. The overall study site was divided for this study into five trapping zones of similar area and within each zone a 50m x 50m trapping area was defined (Fig. 2). Within each of the five trapping zones, medium-sized foldable Sherman traps were placed for a minimum of two consecutive nights and a maximum of six nights with the aim of trapping approximately 50 rodents per zone. In Kibera, all traps were placed indoors at 270 occupied dwellings.


Prevalence and diversity of small mammal-associated Bartonella species in rural and urban Kenya.

Halliday JE, Knobel DL, Agwanda B, Bai Y, Breiman RF, Cleaveland S, Njenga MK, Kosoy M - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Map and summary of rodent trapping sites in Kibera.Summary of the rodents trapped and Bartonella isolates obtained within different trapping zones (A to E) at the Kibera study site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362764&req=5

pntd.0003608.g002: Map and summary of rodent trapping sites in Kibera.Summary of the rodents trapped and Bartonella isolates obtained within different trapping zones (A to E) at the Kibera study site.
Mentions: In Asembo, trapping was conducted over the period of July—August 2009. Traps were placed at 50 compounds that were a randomly selected subset of livestock-owning compounds enrolled in a larger study of zoonoses epidemiology [26]. Within each selected compound, five or six medium-sized foldable Sherman traps (H.B. Sherman Traps Inc., Tallahassee, FL) were placed for three or four nights. Traps were placed in three categories of habitat: within occupied dwellings; within outbuildings, which included unoccupied dwellings, stores, latrines or kitchens separate from the main dwelling; and outside, in areas within the compound yard. In Kibera, trapping was conducted over the period of September—November 2008. The overall study site was divided for this study into five trapping zones of similar area and within each zone a 50m x 50m trapping area was defined (Fig. 2). Within each of the five trapping zones, medium-sized foldable Sherman traps were placed for a minimum of two consecutive nights and a maximum of six nights with the aim of trapping approximately 50 rodents per zone. In Kibera, all traps were placed indoors at 270 occupied dwellings.

Bottom Line: Several rodent-associated Bartonella species are human pathogens but little is known about their epidemiology.In Kibera, 60% of Rattus rattus were positive, as compared to 13% in Asembo.Acute febrile illness occurs at high incidence in both Asembo and Kibera but the etiology of many of these illnesses is unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Several rodent-associated Bartonella species are human pathogens but little is known about their epidemiology. We trapped rodents and shrews around human habitations at two sites in Kenya (rural Asembo and urban Kibera) to determine the prevalence of Bartonella infection. Bartonella were detected by culture in five of seven host species. In Kibera, 60% of Rattus rattus were positive, as compared to 13% in Asembo. Bartonella were also detected in C. olivieri (7%), Lemniscomys striatus (50%), Mastomys natalensis (43%) and R. norvegicus (50%). Partial sequencing of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene of isolates showed that Kibera strains were similar to reference isolates from Rattus trapped in Asia, America, and Europe, but that most strains from Asembo were less similar. Host species and trapping location were associated with differences in infection status but there was no evidence of associations between host age or sex and infection status. Acute febrile illness occurs at high incidence in both Asembo and Kibera but the etiology of many of these illnesses is unknown. Bartonella similar to known human pathogens were detected in small mammals at both sites and investigation of the ecological determinants of host infection status and of the public health significance of Bartonella infections at these locations is warranted.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus