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Optimising the application of multiple-capture traps for invasive species management using spatial simulation.

Warburton B, Gormley AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Internationally, invasive vertebrate species pose a significant threat to biodiversity, agricultural production and human health.In New Zealand, brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), stoats (Mustela ermine), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive and there is an ongoing demand for cost-effective non-toxic methods for controlling these pests.Results were similar for stoats, although only two potential captures per site were sufficient to capture 99% of simulated stoats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research-Manaaki Whenua, PO Box 40, Lincoln, 7640, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Internationally, invasive vertebrate species pose a significant threat to biodiversity, agricultural production and human health. To manage these species a wide range of tools, including traps, are used. In New Zealand, brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), stoats (Mustela ermine), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive and there is an ongoing demand for cost-effective non-toxic methods for controlling these pests. Recently, traps with multiple-capture capability have been developed which, because they do not require regular operator-checking, are purported to be more cost-effective than traditional single-capture traps. However, when pest populations are being maintained at low densities (as is typical of orchestrated pest management programmes) it remains uncertain if it is more cost-effective to use fewer multiple-capture traps or more single-capture traps. To address this uncertainty, we used an individual-based spatially explicit modelling approach to determine the likely maximum animal-captures per trap, given stated pest densities and defined times traps are left between checks. In the simulation, single- or multiple-capture traps were spaced according to best practice pest-control guidelines. For possums with maintenance densities set at the lowest level (i.e. 0.5/ha), 98% of all simulated possums were captured with only a single capacity trap set at each site. When possum density was increased to moderate levels of 3/ha, having a capacity of three captures per trap caught 97% of all simulated possums. Results were similar for stoats, although only two potential captures per site were sufficient to capture 99% of simulated stoats. For rats, which were simulated at their typically higher densities, even a six-capture capacity per trap site only resulted in 80% kill. Depending on target species, prevailing density and extent of immigration, the most cost-effective strategy for pest control in New Zealand might be to deploy several single-capture traps rather than investing in fewer, but more expense, multiple-capture traps.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The proportion of the simulated rat population captured by traps with capture capacity ranging from 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 captures at different rat densities assuming no immigration (a) and with immigration (b).
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pone.0120373.g006: The proportion of the simulated rat population captured by traps with capture capacity ranging from 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 captures at different rat densities assuming no immigration (a) and with immigration (b).

Mentions: At low simulated rat densities, increasing the trap capture capacity had little effect on the proportion of animals captured (Fig. 6), with 77% of rats captured over 30 days using single capture traps, increasing to 81% with multi-capture traps. Efficacy of single-capture traps decreased greatly with increasing rat density, trapping only 32% of the population when at the highest rat densities. When trap capacity was increased to at least three rats per capture, greater than a 71% capture rate was achieved for the entire range of rat densities considered, and greater than 80% when trap-capacity was increased to at least six rats (Fig. 6). At the highest rat densities, increasing trap capacity to 12 resulted in small gains in capture percentage (81% for 12-capture traps compared to 72% for 3-capture traps).


Optimising the application of multiple-capture traps for invasive species management using spatial simulation.

Warburton B, Gormley AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

The proportion of the simulated rat population captured by traps with capture capacity ranging from 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 captures at different rat densities assuming no immigration (a) and with immigration (b).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362759&req=5

pone.0120373.g006: The proportion of the simulated rat population captured by traps with capture capacity ranging from 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 captures at different rat densities assuming no immigration (a) and with immigration (b).
Mentions: At low simulated rat densities, increasing the trap capture capacity had little effect on the proportion of animals captured (Fig. 6), with 77% of rats captured over 30 days using single capture traps, increasing to 81% with multi-capture traps. Efficacy of single-capture traps decreased greatly with increasing rat density, trapping only 32% of the population when at the highest rat densities. When trap capacity was increased to at least three rats per capture, greater than a 71% capture rate was achieved for the entire range of rat densities considered, and greater than 80% when trap-capacity was increased to at least six rats (Fig. 6). At the highest rat densities, increasing trap capacity to 12 resulted in small gains in capture percentage (81% for 12-capture traps compared to 72% for 3-capture traps).

Bottom Line: Internationally, invasive vertebrate species pose a significant threat to biodiversity, agricultural production and human health.In New Zealand, brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), stoats (Mustela ermine), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive and there is an ongoing demand for cost-effective non-toxic methods for controlling these pests.Results were similar for stoats, although only two potential captures per site were sufficient to capture 99% of simulated stoats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research-Manaaki Whenua, PO Box 40, Lincoln, 7640, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Internationally, invasive vertebrate species pose a significant threat to biodiversity, agricultural production and human health. To manage these species a wide range of tools, including traps, are used. In New Zealand, brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), stoats (Mustela ermine), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive and there is an ongoing demand for cost-effective non-toxic methods for controlling these pests. Recently, traps with multiple-capture capability have been developed which, because they do not require regular operator-checking, are purported to be more cost-effective than traditional single-capture traps. However, when pest populations are being maintained at low densities (as is typical of orchestrated pest management programmes) it remains uncertain if it is more cost-effective to use fewer multiple-capture traps or more single-capture traps. To address this uncertainty, we used an individual-based spatially explicit modelling approach to determine the likely maximum animal-captures per trap, given stated pest densities and defined times traps are left between checks. In the simulation, single- or multiple-capture traps were spaced according to best practice pest-control guidelines. For possums with maintenance densities set at the lowest level (i.e. 0.5/ha), 98% of all simulated possums were captured with only a single capacity trap set at each site. When possum density was increased to moderate levels of 3/ha, having a capacity of three captures per trap caught 97% of all simulated possums. Results were similar for stoats, although only two potential captures per site were sufficient to capture 99% of simulated stoats. For rats, which were simulated at their typically higher densities, even a six-capture capacity per trap site only resulted in 80% kill. Depending on target species, prevailing density and extent of immigration, the most cost-effective strategy for pest control in New Zealand might be to deploy several single-capture traps rather than investing in fewer, but more expense, multiple-capture traps.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus