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Hemodynamics of a hydrodynamic injection.

Kanefuji T, Yokoo T, Suda T, Abe H, Kamimura K, Liu D - Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev (2014)

Bottom Line: The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds) and slow (60 seconds) injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium.Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP), and the inferior vena cava (IVC) distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP.In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University , Niigata, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The hemodynamics during a hydrodynamic injection were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fluoroscopic imaging. The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds) and slow (60 seconds) injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium. Hydrodynamically injected solution traveled to the heart and drew back to the hepatic veins (HV), which led to liver expansion and a trace amount of spillover into the portal vein (PV). The liver volumes peaked at 165.6 ± 13.3% and 165.5 ± 11.9% of the original liver volumes in the hydrodynamic and slow injections, respectively. Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP), and the inferior vena cava (IVC) distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP. In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow. These results suggest that the enlargement speed of the liver, rather than the expanded volume, primarily determines the efficiency of hydrodynamic delivery to the liver.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the injected solution. (a) The mice were euthanized soon after either a hydrodynamic or slow injection of the phase-contrast medium (9% of body weight) into the tail vein, and underwent a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan for the reconstruction of the slices (i–iv) suitable for the measurement of the image intensity. The intensities were measured at the right atrium (#1, RA), hepatic vein (#2, HV), portal vein (#3, PV), inferior vena cava caudal to the commissura of the hepatic veins (#4, IVC), and liver parenchyma (#5, LP). (b) Representative maximum intensity projection images showing the distribution of the contrast medium after the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The median intensities were higher at PV than at LP in the mice receiving a slow injection. In contrast, the intensities were significantly higher at LP than at PV in the mice receiving a hydrodynamic injection (*P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the image intensity between other combinations including PV and HV. Three mice were used for each of the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The error bars indicate mean + SD.
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fig4: Distribution of the injected solution. (a) The mice were euthanized soon after either a hydrodynamic or slow injection of the phase-contrast medium (9% of body weight) into the tail vein, and underwent a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan for the reconstruction of the slices (i–iv) suitable for the measurement of the image intensity. The intensities were measured at the right atrium (#1, RA), hepatic vein (#2, HV), portal vein (#3, PV), inferior vena cava caudal to the commissura of the hepatic veins (#4, IVC), and liver parenchyma (#5, LP). (b) Representative maximum intensity projection images showing the distribution of the contrast medium after the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The median intensities were higher at PV than at LP in the mice receiving a slow injection. In contrast, the intensities were significantly higher at LP than at PV in the mice receiving a hydrodynamic injection (*P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the image intensity between other combinations including PV and HV. Three mice were used for each of the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The error bars indicate mean + SD.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 4a, the image intensities were measured in five regions: the right atrium (#1), HV (#2), PV (#3), IVC caudal to the commissura of the HVs (IVC, #4), and the liver parenchyma (LP, #5) in the above three mice from each hydrodynamic or slow injection. As shown in Figure 4b, the image intensity of PV (median and interquartile range: 3536 and 3467—3590 Hounsfield unit (HU)) was significantly higher than that of LP (2844 and 2811—2975 HU, P < 0.05) in slow injection, whereas hydrodynamic injection resulted in a significantly higher intensity of LP (5255 and 5243—5622 HU) comparing with that of PV (2474 and 2428—2554 HU, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the image intensities between any other comparisons including between PV and HV. The CBCT MIP images represent the distribution of the contrast medium after both the hydrodynamic and slow injections (Figure 4b and Supplementary Videos S4 and S5).


Hemodynamics of a hydrodynamic injection.

Kanefuji T, Yokoo T, Suda T, Abe H, Kamimura K, Liu D - Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev (2014)

Distribution of the injected solution. (a) The mice were euthanized soon after either a hydrodynamic or slow injection of the phase-contrast medium (9% of body weight) into the tail vein, and underwent a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan for the reconstruction of the slices (i–iv) suitable for the measurement of the image intensity. The intensities were measured at the right atrium (#1, RA), hepatic vein (#2, HV), portal vein (#3, PV), inferior vena cava caudal to the commissura of the hepatic veins (#4, IVC), and liver parenchyma (#5, LP). (b) Representative maximum intensity projection images showing the distribution of the contrast medium after the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The median intensities were higher at PV than at LP in the mice receiving a slow injection. In contrast, the intensities were significantly higher at LP than at PV in the mice receiving a hydrodynamic injection (*P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the image intensity between other combinations including PV and HV. Three mice were used for each of the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The error bars indicate mean + SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362352&req=5

fig4: Distribution of the injected solution. (a) The mice were euthanized soon after either a hydrodynamic or slow injection of the phase-contrast medium (9% of body weight) into the tail vein, and underwent a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan for the reconstruction of the slices (i–iv) suitable for the measurement of the image intensity. The intensities were measured at the right atrium (#1, RA), hepatic vein (#2, HV), portal vein (#3, PV), inferior vena cava caudal to the commissura of the hepatic veins (#4, IVC), and liver parenchyma (#5, LP). (b) Representative maximum intensity projection images showing the distribution of the contrast medium after the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The median intensities were higher at PV than at LP in the mice receiving a slow injection. In contrast, the intensities were significantly higher at LP than at PV in the mice receiving a hydrodynamic injection (*P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the image intensity between other combinations including PV and HV. Three mice were used for each of the hydrodynamic and slow injections. The error bars indicate mean + SD.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 4a, the image intensities were measured in five regions: the right atrium (#1), HV (#2), PV (#3), IVC caudal to the commissura of the HVs (IVC, #4), and the liver parenchyma (LP, #5) in the above three mice from each hydrodynamic or slow injection. As shown in Figure 4b, the image intensity of PV (median and interquartile range: 3536 and 3467—3590 Hounsfield unit (HU)) was significantly higher than that of LP (2844 and 2811—2975 HU, P < 0.05) in slow injection, whereas hydrodynamic injection resulted in a significantly higher intensity of LP (5255 and 5243—5622 HU) comparing with that of PV (2474 and 2428—2554 HU, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the image intensities between any other comparisons including between PV and HV. The CBCT MIP images represent the distribution of the contrast medium after both the hydrodynamic and slow injections (Figure 4b and Supplementary Videos S4 and S5).

Bottom Line: The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds) and slow (60 seconds) injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium.Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP), and the inferior vena cava (IVC) distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP.In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University , Niigata, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The hemodynamics during a hydrodynamic injection were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fluoroscopic imaging. The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds) and slow (60 seconds) injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium. Hydrodynamically injected solution traveled to the heart and drew back to the hepatic veins (HV), which led to liver expansion and a trace amount of spillover into the portal vein (PV). The liver volumes peaked at 165.6 ± 13.3% and 165.5 ± 11.9% of the original liver volumes in the hydrodynamic and slow injections, respectively. Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP), and the inferior vena cava (IVC) distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP. In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow. These results suggest that the enlargement speed of the liver, rather than the expanded volume, primarily determines the efficiency of hydrodynamic delivery to the liver.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus