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Modern reproductive patterns associated with estrogen receptor positive but not negative breast cancer susceptibility.

Aktipis CA, Ellis BJ, Nishimura KK, Hiatt RA - Evol Med Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: We conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether this 'evolutionary mismatch hypothesis' can explain susceptibility to both estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) cancer.Our meta-analysis includes a total of 33 studies and examines parity, age of first birth and age of menarche broken down by estrogen receptor status.We found that modern reproductive patterns are more closely linked to ER-positive than ER-negative breast cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Evolution and Cancer, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street S-341, Box 0128, San Francisco, CA 94143-0128, USA; Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, PO Box 871104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, USA; Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Arizona, 650 N Park Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, Box 0560, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA Center for Evolution and Cancer, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street S-341, Box 0128, San Francisco, CA 94143-0128, USA; Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, PO Box 871104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, USA; Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Arizona, 650 N Park Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, Box 0560, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA aktipis@asu.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Later age of first birth is associated with a higher risk of ER-positive breast cancer. (b) Later age of first birth is not associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer. OR was calculated using a random effects model to account for heterogeneity of study populations. The red squares and horizontal black lines represent the ORs and 95% CIs for each study. The black diamond and its width represent the overall effect estimate and the 95% CI. The vertical black line represents the  hypothesis (OR of 1). Premeno. = pre-menopausal, Postmeno. = post-menopausal, cont. = continuous, ER = estrogen receptor, PR = progesterone receptor, TN = triple negative, HER2 = human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Lum. = luminal, LE = less than or equal to, GE = greater than or equal to
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eou028-F2: (a) Later age of first birth is associated with a higher risk of ER-positive breast cancer. (b) Later age of first birth is not associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer. OR was calculated using a random effects model to account for heterogeneity of study populations. The red squares and horizontal black lines represent the ORs and 95% CIs for each study. The black diamond and its width represent the overall effect estimate and the 95% CI. The vertical black line represents the hypothesis (OR of 1). Premeno. = pre-menopausal, Postmeno. = post-menopausal, cont. = continuous, ER = estrogen receptor, PR = progesterone receptor, TN = triple negative, HER2 = human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Lum. = luminal, LE = less than or equal to, GE = greater than or equal to

Mentions: Our meta-analysis indicated that late age of first birth (after age 30 or 35) was associated with higher odds of ER-positive breast cancer (Fig. 2a; OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.30–1.55, P < 0.001). ER-negative breast cancer, on the other hand, was not found to be associated with late age of first birth (Fig. 2b; OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.91–1.21, P = 0.53).Figure 2.


Modern reproductive patterns associated with estrogen receptor positive but not negative breast cancer susceptibility.

Aktipis CA, Ellis BJ, Nishimura KK, Hiatt RA - Evol Med Public Health (2014)

(a) Later age of first birth is associated with a higher risk of ER-positive breast cancer. (b) Later age of first birth is not associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer. OR was calculated using a random effects model to account for heterogeneity of study populations. The red squares and horizontal black lines represent the ORs and 95% CIs for each study. The black diamond and its width represent the overall effect estimate and the 95% CI. The vertical black line represents the  hypothesis (OR of 1). Premeno. = pre-menopausal, Postmeno. = post-menopausal, cont. = continuous, ER = estrogen receptor, PR = progesterone receptor, TN = triple negative, HER2 = human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Lum. = luminal, LE = less than or equal to, GE = greater than or equal to
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4362290&req=5

eou028-F2: (a) Later age of first birth is associated with a higher risk of ER-positive breast cancer. (b) Later age of first birth is not associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer. OR was calculated using a random effects model to account for heterogeneity of study populations. The red squares and horizontal black lines represent the ORs and 95% CIs for each study. The black diamond and its width represent the overall effect estimate and the 95% CI. The vertical black line represents the hypothesis (OR of 1). Premeno. = pre-menopausal, Postmeno. = post-menopausal, cont. = continuous, ER = estrogen receptor, PR = progesterone receptor, TN = triple negative, HER2 = human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Lum. = luminal, LE = less than or equal to, GE = greater than or equal to
Mentions: Our meta-analysis indicated that late age of first birth (after age 30 or 35) was associated with higher odds of ER-positive breast cancer (Fig. 2a; OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.30–1.55, P < 0.001). ER-negative breast cancer, on the other hand, was not found to be associated with late age of first birth (Fig. 2b; OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.91–1.21, P = 0.53).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: We conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether this 'evolutionary mismatch hypothesis' can explain susceptibility to both estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) cancer.Our meta-analysis includes a total of 33 studies and examines parity, age of first birth and age of menarche broken down by estrogen receptor status.We found that modern reproductive patterns are more closely linked to ER-positive than ER-negative breast cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Evolution and Cancer, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street S-341, Box 0128, San Francisco, CA 94143-0128, USA; Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, PO Box 871104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, USA; Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Arizona, 650 N Park Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, Box 0560, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA Center for Evolution and Cancer, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street S-341, Box 0128, San Francisco, CA 94143-0128, USA; Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, PO Box 871104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, USA; Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Arizona, 650 N Park Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, Box 0560, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA aktipis@asu.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus