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Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs.

Kraak VI, Story M - Obes Rev (2014)

Bottom Line: Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding.However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables.Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Process used for the systematic review to identify experimental studies that examined the influence of brand mascots and cartoon media characters on the diet-related outcomes of children <12 years.
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fig04: Process used for the systematic review to identify experimental studies that examined the influence of brand mascots and cartoon media characters on the diet-related outcomes of children <12 years.

Mentions: The co-investigators independently reviewed the abstracts and full papers for the final selection. As shown in Fig. 4, 50 studies were initially identified, but were reduced to 46 studies after removing duplicates. After reviewing the abstracts, 28 records were excluded leaving 18 records. An additional nine records were excluded after reading the full papers because they were descriptive or did not report relevant outcomes. The reference lists of the remaining nine papers were reviewed for any records that met the inclusion criteria. Two additional papers that met the inclusion criteria were identified and included in the final systematic review (n = 11). The co-investigator independently reviewed the papers and reached consensus with the lead investigator on the records retained. We independently reviewed the evidence to reach consensus on their contents. The analysis was conducted between 1 June and 15 July 2014.


Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs.

Kraak VI, Story M - Obes Rev (2014)

Process used for the systematic review to identify experimental studies that examined the influence of brand mascots and cartoon media characters on the diet-related outcomes of children <12 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359675&req=5

fig04: Process used for the systematic review to identify experimental studies that examined the influence of brand mascots and cartoon media characters on the diet-related outcomes of children <12 years.
Mentions: The co-investigators independently reviewed the abstracts and full papers for the final selection. As shown in Fig. 4, 50 studies were initially identified, but were reduced to 46 studies after removing duplicates. After reviewing the abstracts, 28 records were excluded leaving 18 records. An additional nine records were excluded after reading the full papers because they were descriptive or did not report relevant outcomes. The reference lists of the remaining nine papers were reviewed for any records that met the inclusion criteria. Two additional papers that met the inclusion criteria were identified and included in the final systematic review (n = 11). The co-investigator independently reviewed the papers and reached consensus with the lead investigator on the records retained. We independently reviewed the evidence to reach consensus on their contents. The analysis was conducted between 1 June and 15 July 2014.

Bottom Line: Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding.However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables.Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus