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Is supplementation efficacious in maintaining adequate plasma levels of vitamin a and e for thalassemic patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation? A cross-sectional study.

Hajimahmoodi M, Hadjibabaie M, Hamidieh AA, Ahmadvand A, Kazempanah S, Sadeghi N, Mansouri A, Ghavamzadeh A - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects.But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2).Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Drug and Food Control.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Thalassemia along with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can lead to major oxidative stress. Vitamins A and E are antioxidants which protect membrane from lipid peroxidation. We sought to determine for the first time, whether vitamins A and E supplementation is efficacious in maintaining or increasing plasma level of these vitamins in thalassemic children undergoing HSCT.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 50 children with β-thalassemia major hospitalized for HSCT. Patients took a daily multivitamin. Plasma vitamins A and E levels were measured at four different times: on admission, HSCT day (day 0), day 7 and day 14 after HSCT. Findings : Plasma vitamin A and E were abnormal on admission in most patients (62.0% and 60.0% respectively). Ratio of patient with normal to abnormal plasma level of the vitamins improved from baseline to a peak on day 7 then deteriorated afterward until day 14. There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily oral intake and plasma vitamin A at different times, but plasma vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation subsequently. In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2).

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (±standard error) plasma level of vitamin A at different times (µg/mm3)
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Figure 1: Mean (±standard error) plasma level of vitamin A at different times (µg/mm3)

Mentions: Baseline and clinical data are summarized in Table 1. We calculated mean and standard error for plasma levels of vitamin A and E at differenttimes. Figs. 1 and 2 show trends of changes in plasma level of vitamin A and E. For both vitamins, we observed an increase from baseline to a peak on day 7; but, a decreasing trend was seen after day 7 until day 14. Plasma level of vitamin A was significantly different at different times of the study (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2) (Table 2). There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily vitamin A oral intake and plasma level of vitamin A at different times. Daily vitamin E oral intake and plasma level of vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation at subsequent measurement times (Table 3).


Is supplementation efficacious in maintaining adequate plasma levels of vitamin a and e for thalassemic patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation? A cross-sectional study.

Hajimahmoodi M, Hadjibabaie M, Hamidieh AA, Ahmadvand A, Kazempanah S, Sadeghi N, Mansouri A, Ghavamzadeh A - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

Mean (±standard error) plasma level of vitamin A at different times (µg/mm3)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359602&req=5

Figure 1: Mean (±standard error) plasma level of vitamin A at different times (µg/mm3)
Mentions: Baseline and clinical data are summarized in Table 1. We calculated mean and standard error for plasma levels of vitamin A and E at differenttimes. Figs. 1 and 2 show trends of changes in plasma level of vitamin A and E. For both vitamins, we observed an increase from baseline to a peak on day 7; but, a decreasing trend was seen after day 7 until day 14. Plasma level of vitamin A was significantly different at different times of the study (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2) (Table 2). There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily vitamin A oral intake and plasma level of vitamin A at different times. Daily vitamin E oral intake and plasma level of vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation at subsequent measurement times (Table 3).

Bottom Line: In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects.But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2).Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Drug and Food Control.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Thalassemia along with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can lead to major oxidative stress. Vitamins A and E are antioxidants which protect membrane from lipid peroxidation. We sought to determine for the first time, whether vitamins A and E supplementation is efficacious in maintaining or increasing plasma level of these vitamins in thalassemic children undergoing HSCT.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 50 children with β-thalassemia major hospitalized for HSCT. Patients took a daily multivitamin. Plasma vitamins A and E levels were measured at four different times: on admission, HSCT day (day 0), day 7 and day 14 after HSCT. Findings : Plasma vitamin A and E were abnormal on admission in most patients (62.0% and 60.0% respectively). Ratio of patient with normal to abnormal plasma level of the vitamins improved from baseline to a peak on day 7 then deteriorated afterward until day 14. There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily oral intake and plasma vitamin A at different times, but plasma vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation subsequently. In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2).

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus