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Efficacy of pregabalin in childhood refractory partial seizure.

Zamani G, Tavasoli A, Zare-Shahabadi A, Rezaei N, Ahmadvand A - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: Several anticonvulsant drugs have entered the market in recent decades but concerns about intolerance, drug interactions, and the safety of the drug are notable.One of these new anticonvulsants is pregabalin, a safe drug with almost no interaction with other antiepileptic drugs.This study showed that pregabalin can be used with safety and an acceptable efficacy in treatment of childhood refractory partial seizures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Neurology.

ABSTRACT

Objective: About one third of partial seizures are refractory to treatment. Several anticonvulsant drugs have entered the market in recent decades but concerns about intolerance, drug interactions, and the safety of the drug are notable. One of these new anticonvulsants is pregabalin, a safe drug with almost no interaction with other antiepileptic drugs.

Methods: In this open label clinical trial study, pregabalin was used for evaluation of its efficacy on reducing seizure frequency in 29 children suffering from refractory partial seizures. Average daily and weekly seizure frequency of the patients was recorded during a 6-week period (baseline period). Then, during a period of 2 weeks (titration period), pregabalin was started with a dose of 25-75 mg/d, using method of flexible dose, and was brought to maximum dose of drug that was intended in this study (450 mg/d) based on clinical response of the patients and seizure frequency. Then the patients were given the drug for 12 weeks and the average frequency of daily and weekly seizures were recorded again (treatment period). Findings : Reduction in seizure frequency in this study was 36% and the responder rate or number of patients who gained more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency was 51.7%.

Conclusion: This study showed that pregabalin can be used with safety and an acceptable efficacy in treatment of childhood refractory partial seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic presentation of pregabalin action on voltage-gated calcium channels in presynaptic neuron(۞)
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Figure 1: Schematic presentation of pregabalin action on voltage-gated calcium channels in presynaptic neuron(۞)

Mentions: The management of epilepsy should be towards complete control of seizures with respect to minimizing the occurrence of adverse effects of drugs and improving the patient’s quality of life[4]. Pregabalin (Lyrica™) is one of the latest additions in the antiepileptic medication regimen that is structurally similar to Gabapentin. It was approved by Food and Drug Administration in USA, 2005, as an add-on therapy for partial epilepsy, post-herpetic neuralgia, and fibromyalgia. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated its effectiveness on peripheral and central neuropathic pain, and in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder[4-7]. This drug crosses the blood-brain barrier, and binds potently to the α2-d subunit, an auxiliary protein associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, attenuating depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx in nerve terminals that results in decreasing the level of the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, noradrenaline and substance P (Fig. 1)[2,6].


Efficacy of pregabalin in childhood refractory partial seizure.

Zamani G, Tavasoli A, Zare-Shahabadi A, Rezaei N, Ahmadvand A - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

Schematic presentation of pregabalin action on voltage-gated calcium channels in presynaptic neuron(۞)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359591&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic presentation of pregabalin action on voltage-gated calcium channels in presynaptic neuron(۞)
Mentions: The management of epilepsy should be towards complete control of seizures with respect to minimizing the occurrence of adverse effects of drugs and improving the patient’s quality of life[4]. Pregabalin (Lyrica™) is one of the latest additions in the antiepileptic medication regimen that is structurally similar to Gabapentin. It was approved by Food and Drug Administration in USA, 2005, as an add-on therapy for partial epilepsy, post-herpetic neuralgia, and fibromyalgia. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated its effectiveness on peripheral and central neuropathic pain, and in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder[4-7]. This drug crosses the blood-brain barrier, and binds potently to the α2-d subunit, an auxiliary protein associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, attenuating depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx in nerve terminals that results in decreasing the level of the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, noradrenaline and substance P (Fig. 1)[2,6].

Bottom Line: Several anticonvulsant drugs have entered the market in recent decades but concerns about intolerance, drug interactions, and the safety of the drug are notable.One of these new anticonvulsants is pregabalin, a safe drug with almost no interaction with other antiepileptic drugs.This study showed that pregabalin can be used with safety and an acceptable efficacy in treatment of childhood refractory partial seizures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Neurology.

ABSTRACT

Objective: About one third of partial seizures are refractory to treatment. Several anticonvulsant drugs have entered the market in recent decades but concerns about intolerance, drug interactions, and the safety of the drug are notable. One of these new anticonvulsants is pregabalin, a safe drug with almost no interaction with other antiepileptic drugs.

Methods: In this open label clinical trial study, pregabalin was used for evaluation of its efficacy on reducing seizure frequency in 29 children suffering from refractory partial seizures. Average daily and weekly seizure frequency of the patients was recorded during a 6-week period (baseline period). Then, during a period of 2 weeks (titration period), pregabalin was started with a dose of 25-75 mg/d, using method of flexible dose, and was brought to maximum dose of drug that was intended in this study (450 mg/d) based on clinical response of the patients and seizure frequency. Then the patients were given the drug for 12 weeks and the average frequency of daily and weekly seizures were recorded again (treatment period). Findings : Reduction in seizure frequency in this study was 36% and the responder rate or number of patients who gained more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency was 51.7%.

Conclusion: This study showed that pregabalin can be used with safety and an acceptable efficacy in treatment of childhood refractory partial seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus