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Food allergy in the Netherlands: differences in clinical severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between community and outpatients.

Le TM, van Hoffen E, Kummeling I, Potts J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Lebens AF, Lidholm J, Lindner TM, Mackie A, Mills EC, van Ree R, Vieths S, Fernández-Rivas M, Burney PG, Knulst AC - Clin Transl Allergy (2015)

Bottom Line: When selecting only those with a probable FA (i.e. symptoms of priority food and elevation of sIgE to the respective food), no major differences were observed with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between the groups.In the Netherlands, there are large differences in self-reported FA between community and outpatients.However, Dutch community and outpatients with a probable FA do not differ with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC-outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology/Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: It is unknown whether food allergy (FA) in an unselected population is comparable to those from an outpatient clinic population.

Objective: To discover if FA in a random sample from the Dutch community is comparable to that of outpatients.

Methods: This study was part of the Europrevall-project. A random sample of 6600 adults received a questionnaire. Those with symptoms to one of 24 defined priority foods were tested for sIgE. Participants with a positive case history and elevated sIgE were evaluated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). Outpatients with a suspicion of FA were evaluated by questionnaire, sIgE and DBPCFC.

Results: In the community, severe symptoms were reported less often than in outpatients (39.3% vs. 54.3%). Participants in the community were less commonly sensitized to any of the foods. When selecting only those with a probable FA (i.e. symptoms of priority food and elevation of sIgE to the respective food), no major differences were observed with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between the groups.

Conclusion: In the Netherlands, there are large differences in self-reported FA between community and outpatients. However, Dutch community and outpatients with a probable FA do not differ with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC-outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow-diagram of the epidemiological part of the study in the community.
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Fig1: Flow-diagram of the epidemiological part of the study in the community.

Mentions: Of the screening questionnaires that were sent out to a random sample of 6600 adults, 3864 responded, of whom 967 (25.0%) reported adverse food reactions to any food and 416 (10.8%) to at least one priority food (Figure 1). 154 of these 416 (37.0%) were willing to come to our clinic for the second stage consisting of a detailed questionnaire and sIgE testing. In 37.7% (58/154) sIgE was positive for the respective food. Of these 58 cases, 46 entered the 3rd stage for a full clinical evaluation.Figure 1


Food allergy in the Netherlands: differences in clinical severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between community and outpatients.

Le TM, van Hoffen E, Kummeling I, Potts J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Lebens AF, Lidholm J, Lindner TM, Mackie A, Mills EC, van Ree R, Vieths S, Fernández-Rivas M, Burney PG, Knulst AC - Clin Transl Allergy (2015)

Flow-diagram of the epidemiological part of the study in the community.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359480&req=5

Fig1: Flow-diagram of the epidemiological part of the study in the community.
Mentions: Of the screening questionnaires that were sent out to a random sample of 6600 adults, 3864 responded, of whom 967 (25.0%) reported adverse food reactions to any food and 416 (10.8%) to at least one priority food (Figure 1). 154 of these 416 (37.0%) were willing to come to our clinic for the second stage consisting of a detailed questionnaire and sIgE testing. In 37.7% (58/154) sIgE was positive for the respective food. Of these 58 cases, 46 entered the 3rd stage for a full clinical evaluation.Figure 1

Bottom Line: When selecting only those with a probable FA (i.e. symptoms of priority food and elevation of sIgE to the respective food), no major differences were observed with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between the groups.In the Netherlands, there are large differences in self-reported FA between community and outpatients.However, Dutch community and outpatients with a probable FA do not differ with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC-outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology/Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: It is unknown whether food allergy (FA) in an unselected population is comparable to those from an outpatient clinic population.

Objective: To discover if FA in a random sample from the Dutch community is comparable to that of outpatients.

Methods: This study was part of the Europrevall-project. A random sample of 6600 adults received a questionnaire. Those with symptoms to one of 24 defined priority foods were tested for sIgE. Participants with a positive case history and elevated sIgE were evaluated by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). Outpatients with a suspicion of FA were evaluated by questionnaire, sIgE and DBPCFC.

Results: In the community, severe symptoms were reported less often than in outpatients (39.3% vs. 54.3%). Participants in the community were less commonly sensitized to any of the foods. When selecting only those with a probable FA (i.e. symptoms of priority food and elevation of sIgE to the respective food), no major differences were observed with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between the groups.

Conclusion: In the Netherlands, there are large differences in self-reported FA between community and outpatients. However, Dutch community and outpatients with a probable FA do not differ with respect to severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC-outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus