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Early neurone loss in Alzheimer's disease: cortical or subcortical?

Arendt T, Brückner MK, Morawski M, Jäger C, Gertz HJ - Acta Neuropathol Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: In all three areas, neurone loss becomes detectable already at preclinical stages and is clearly manifest at prodromal AD/MCI.At more advanced AD, cell loss is most pronounced in the NbM > LC > layer-II EC.During early AD, however, the extent of cell loss is fairly balanced between all three areas without clear indications for a preference of one area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder where the distribution of pathology throughout the brain is not random but follows a predictive pattern used for pathological staging. While the involvement of defined functional systems is fairly well established for more advanced stages, the initial sites of degeneration are still ill defined. The prevailing concept suggests an origin within the transentorhinal and entorhinal cortex (EC) from where pathology spreads to other areas. Still, this concept has been challenged recently suggesting a potential origin of degeneration in nonthalamic subcortical nuclei giving rise to cortical innervation such as locus coeruleus (LC) and nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM). To contribute to the identification of the early site of degeneration, here, we address the question whether cortical or subcortical degeneration occurs more early and develops more quickly during progression of AD. To this end, we stereologically assessed neurone counts in the NbM, LC and EC layer-II in the same AD patients ranging from preclinical stages to severe dementia. In all three areas, neurone loss becomes detectable already at preclinical stages and is clearly manifest at prodromal AD/MCI. At more advanced AD, cell loss is most pronounced in the NbM > LC > layer-II EC. During early AD, however, the extent of cell loss is fairly balanced between all three areas without clear indications for a preference of one area. We can thus not rule out that there is more than one way of spreading from its site of origin or that degeneration even occurs independently at several sites in parallel.

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Comparison of cell loss in the three different areas. Both total neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two. All relationships were significant at p < 0.001; r: coefficient of correlation according to Bravais-Pearson.
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Fig3: Comparison of cell loss in the three different areas. Both total neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two. All relationships were significant at p < 0.001; r: coefficient of correlation according to Bravais-Pearson.

Mentions: For a more direct comparison of cell loss in the three different areas, both absolute neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two (Figure 3). Overall, there was a very high degree of correlation of neurone loss in each of the three areas with those in the other two areas (correlation coefficient r ranging from 0.7794 to 0.8631; p < 0.001).Figure 3


Early neurone loss in Alzheimer's disease: cortical or subcortical?

Arendt T, Brückner MK, Morawski M, Jäger C, Gertz HJ - Acta Neuropathol Commun (2015)

Comparison of cell loss in the three different areas. Both total neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two. All relationships were significant at p < 0.001; r: coefficient of correlation according to Bravais-Pearson.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359478&req=5

Fig3: Comparison of cell loss in the three different areas. Both total neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two. All relationships were significant at p < 0.001; r: coefficient of correlation according to Bravais-Pearson.
Mentions: For a more direct comparison of cell loss in the three different areas, both absolute neurone number and relative neurone loss in each of the regions were plotted against those in the other two (Figure 3). Overall, there was a very high degree of correlation of neurone loss in each of the three areas with those in the other two areas (correlation coefficient r ranging from 0.7794 to 0.8631; p < 0.001).Figure 3

Bottom Line: In all three areas, neurone loss becomes detectable already at preclinical stages and is clearly manifest at prodromal AD/MCI.At more advanced AD, cell loss is most pronounced in the NbM > LC > layer-II EC.During early AD, however, the extent of cell loss is fairly balanced between all three areas without clear indications for a preference of one area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder where the distribution of pathology throughout the brain is not random but follows a predictive pattern used for pathological staging. While the involvement of defined functional systems is fairly well established for more advanced stages, the initial sites of degeneration are still ill defined. The prevailing concept suggests an origin within the transentorhinal and entorhinal cortex (EC) from where pathology spreads to other areas. Still, this concept has been challenged recently suggesting a potential origin of degeneration in nonthalamic subcortical nuclei giving rise to cortical innervation such as locus coeruleus (LC) and nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM). To contribute to the identification of the early site of degeneration, here, we address the question whether cortical or subcortical degeneration occurs more early and develops more quickly during progression of AD. To this end, we stereologically assessed neurone counts in the NbM, LC and EC layer-II in the same AD patients ranging from preclinical stages to severe dementia. In all three areas, neurone loss becomes detectable already at preclinical stages and is clearly manifest at prodromal AD/MCI. At more advanced AD, cell loss is most pronounced in the NbM > LC > layer-II EC. During early AD, however, the extent of cell loss is fairly balanced between all three areas without clear indications for a preference of one area. We can thus not rule out that there is more than one way of spreading from its site of origin or that degeneration even occurs independently at several sites in parallel.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus