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Positive Imagery-Based Cognitive Bias Modification as a Web-Based Treatment Tool for Depressed Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Blackwell SE, Browning M, Mathews A, Pictet A, Welch J, Davies J, Watson P, Geddes JR, Holmes EA - Clin Psychol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Targeting neglected cognitive aspects may provide a useful route.In exploratory analyses, compared with the control, imagery CBM significantly improved anhedonia over the intervention and improved depression symptoms as a whole for those participants with fewer than five episodes of depression and those who engaged to a threshold level of imagery.Anhedonia may be a useful treatment target for future work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

ABSTRACT

Depression is a global health problem requiring treatment innovation. Targeting neglected cognitive aspects may provide a useful route. We tested a cognitive-training paradigm using positive mental imagery (imagery cognitive bias modification, imagery CBM), developed via experimental psychopathology studies, in a randomized controlled trial. Training was delivered via the Internet to 150 individuals with current major depression. Unexpectedly, there was no significant advantage for imagery CBM compared with a closely matched control for depression symptoms as a whole in the full sample. In exploratory analyses, compared with the control, imagery CBM significantly improved anhedonia over the intervention and improved depression symptoms as a whole for those participants with fewer than five episodes of depression and those who engaged to a threshold level of imagery. Results suggest avenues for improving imagery CBM to inform low-intensity treatment tools for depression. Anhedonia may be a useful treatment target for future work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow of participants through the trial. BDI-II = Beck Depression Inventory–II.
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fig1-2167702614560746: Flow of participants through the trial. BDI-II = Beck Depression Inventory–II.

Mentions: Participants were recruited from February 2012 to February 2013. Follow-up was completed by November 2013. Recruitment stopped at 150 participants, which was the planned target. Of 252 people assessed for eligibility, 74 did not meet the inclusion criteria, 28 met inclusion criteria but dropped out prior to randomization, and 150 were randomized (see Fig. 1). Overall, 141 (94%) participants completed at least the BDI-II postintervention (primary outcome), and 140 (93%), 129 (86%), and 133 (89%) completed at least this outcome measure at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Attrition was comparable between the two conditions (see Fig. 1), as were baseline characteristics (see Table 1). Participants in the control condition scored significantly higher at baseline than did those in the imagery condition on vividness of negative future imagery (PIT negative vividness), t(148) = 2.58, p = .011, d = 0.42.


Positive Imagery-Based Cognitive Bias Modification as a Web-Based Treatment Tool for Depressed Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Blackwell SE, Browning M, Mathews A, Pictet A, Welch J, Davies J, Watson P, Geddes JR, Holmes EA - Clin Psychol Sci (2015)

Flow of participants through the trial. BDI-II = Beck Depression Inventory–II.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359210&req=5

fig1-2167702614560746: Flow of participants through the trial. BDI-II = Beck Depression Inventory–II.
Mentions: Participants were recruited from February 2012 to February 2013. Follow-up was completed by November 2013. Recruitment stopped at 150 participants, which was the planned target. Of 252 people assessed for eligibility, 74 did not meet the inclusion criteria, 28 met inclusion criteria but dropped out prior to randomization, and 150 were randomized (see Fig. 1). Overall, 141 (94%) participants completed at least the BDI-II postintervention (primary outcome), and 140 (93%), 129 (86%), and 133 (89%) completed at least this outcome measure at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Attrition was comparable between the two conditions (see Fig. 1), as were baseline characteristics (see Table 1). Participants in the control condition scored significantly higher at baseline than did those in the imagery condition on vividness of negative future imagery (PIT negative vividness), t(148) = 2.58, p = .011, d = 0.42.

Bottom Line: Targeting neglected cognitive aspects may provide a useful route.In exploratory analyses, compared with the control, imagery CBM significantly improved anhedonia over the intervention and improved depression symptoms as a whole for those participants with fewer than five episodes of depression and those who engaged to a threshold level of imagery.Anhedonia may be a useful treatment target for future work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

ABSTRACT

Depression is a global health problem requiring treatment innovation. Targeting neglected cognitive aspects may provide a useful route. We tested a cognitive-training paradigm using positive mental imagery (imagery cognitive bias modification, imagery CBM), developed via experimental psychopathology studies, in a randomized controlled trial. Training was delivered via the Internet to 150 individuals with current major depression. Unexpectedly, there was no significant advantage for imagery CBM compared with a closely matched control for depression symptoms as a whole in the full sample. In exploratory analyses, compared with the control, imagery CBM significantly improved anhedonia over the intervention and improved depression symptoms as a whole for those participants with fewer than five episodes of depression and those who engaged to a threshold level of imagery. Results suggest avenues for improving imagery CBM to inform low-intensity treatment tools for depression. Anhedonia may be a useful treatment target for future work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus