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Irritable brain caused by irritable bowel? A nationwide analysis for irritable bowel syndrome and risk of bipolar disorder.

Liu CJ, Hu LY, Yeh CM, Hu YW, Chen PM, Chen TJ, Lu T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We also identified a comparison matched cohort without IBS.The IBS cohort consisted of 30,796 patients and the comparison cohort consisted of 30,796 matched patients without IBS.Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Public Health & School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We explored the association between IBS and the development of bipolar disorder, and the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with IBS.

Methods: We identified patients who were newly diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We also identified a comparison matched cohort without IBS. The occurrence of new-onset bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts.

Results: The IBS cohort consisted of 30,796 patients and the comparison cohort consisted of 30,796 matched patients without IBS. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio, 2.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.10-3.31, P < .001) was higher in the IBS patients than in the matched cohort. Multivariate matched regression models indicated that autoimmune diseases (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.07-2.17, P = .020), and asthma (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.08-1.95, P = .013) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder in the IBS patients.

Conclusion: IBS may increase the risk of developing subsequent bipolar disorder. Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative incidence of subsequent bipolar disorders in patients with and without Irritable bowel syndrome.
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pone.0118209.g001: Cumulative incidence of subsequent bipolar disorders in patients with and without Irritable bowel syndrome.

Mentions: Fig. 1 displays the cumulative incidences of bipolar disorders in the study patients. As shown in Table 2, the risk of developing bipolar disorder was significantly higher in the patients with IBS than in the matched patients (IRR, 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10–3.31; P <. 001). When we stratified the patients according to age and sex, the IBS cohort exhibited a similarly increased risk of developing bipolar disorder compared to the matched cohort. When we stratified the patients according to the duration of follow-up, we observed the risk of developing bipolar disorder remained higher in the IBS cohort with longer durations of follow-up (1–5 y and ≥5 y). Overall, the incidence of bipolar disorder after a diagnosis of IBS was 1.6 per 1000 person-years.


Irritable brain caused by irritable bowel? A nationwide analysis for irritable bowel syndrome and risk of bipolar disorder.

Liu CJ, Hu LY, Yeh CM, Hu YW, Chen PM, Chen TJ, Lu T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cumulative incidence of subsequent bipolar disorders in patients with and without Irritable bowel syndrome.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359162&req=5

pone.0118209.g001: Cumulative incidence of subsequent bipolar disorders in patients with and without Irritable bowel syndrome.
Mentions: Fig. 1 displays the cumulative incidences of bipolar disorders in the study patients. As shown in Table 2, the risk of developing bipolar disorder was significantly higher in the patients with IBS than in the matched patients (IRR, 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10–3.31; P <. 001). When we stratified the patients according to age and sex, the IBS cohort exhibited a similarly increased risk of developing bipolar disorder compared to the matched cohort. When we stratified the patients according to the duration of follow-up, we observed the risk of developing bipolar disorder remained higher in the IBS cohort with longer durations of follow-up (1–5 y and ≥5 y). Overall, the incidence of bipolar disorder after a diagnosis of IBS was 1.6 per 1000 person-years.

Bottom Line: We also identified a comparison matched cohort without IBS.The IBS cohort consisted of 30,796 patients and the comparison cohort consisted of 30,796 matched patients without IBS.Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Public Health & School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We explored the association between IBS and the development of bipolar disorder, and the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with IBS.

Methods: We identified patients who were newly diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We also identified a comparison matched cohort without IBS. The occurrence of new-onset bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts.

Results: The IBS cohort consisted of 30,796 patients and the comparison cohort consisted of 30,796 matched patients without IBS. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio, 2.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.10-3.31, P < .001) was higher in the IBS patients than in the matched cohort. Multivariate matched regression models indicated that autoimmune diseases (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.07-2.17, P = .020), and asthma (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.08-1.95, P = .013) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder in the IBS patients.

Conclusion: IBS may increase the risk of developing subsequent bipolar disorder. Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus