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Binge ethanol prior to traumatic brain injury worsens sensorimotor functional recovery in rats.

Vaagenes IC, Tsai SY, Ton ST, Husak VA, McGuire SO, O'Brien TE, Kartje GL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury.Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured.We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury. Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured. Our objective was to determine the consequences of a binge paradigm of alcohol intoxication at the time of TBI on long-term functional outcome using a sensitive test of sensorimotor function. We trained adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats on the skilled forelimb reaching task and then administered a single binge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) or saline for three consecutive days (for a total of 3 doses). One hour after the final ethanol dose, rats underwent a TBI to the sensorimotor cortex corresponding to the preferred reaching forelimb. Animals were then tested for seven weeks on the skilled forelimb reaching task to assess the profile of recovery. We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group. Therefore, even a relatively short (3 day) episode of binge alcohol exposure can negatively impact long-term recovery from a TBI, underscoring this significant public health problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Representative nissl stained coronal sections of saline treated and ethanol treated seven weeks post traumatic brain injury.The arrows indicate the location of the lesion. B. Lesion size expressed as a percent of the unlesioned hemisphere. No significant difference was found between saline and ethanol treated animals p>.05 (unpaired t-test). Error bars denote the ± SEM.
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pone.0120356.g002: A. Representative nissl stained coronal sections of saline treated and ethanol treated seven weeks post traumatic brain injury.The arrows indicate the location of the lesion. B. Lesion size expressed as a percent of the unlesioned hemisphere. No significant difference was found between saline and ethanol treated animals p>.05 (unpaired t-test). Error bars denote the ± SEM.

Mentions: TBI lesion size was quantified at the end of the behavioral testing (Fig. 2) and taken together with the exhibited behavioral deficits indicated a mild to moderate TBI in all animals. No statistically significant difference was found between groups (9.9% ± 2.0 in ethanol treated rats vs. 8.7% ± 1.4 in saline treated rats, unpaired t-test, p>.05).


Binge ethanol prior to traumatic brain injury worsens sensorimotor functional recovery in rats.

Vaagenes IC, Tsai SY, Ton ST, Husak VA, McGuire SO, O'Brien TE, Kartje GL - PLoS ONE (2015)

A. Representative nissl stained coronal sections of saline treated and ethanol treated seven weeks post traumatic brain injury.The arrows indicate the location of the lesion. B. Lesion size expressed as a percent of the unlesioned hemisphere. No significant difference was found between saline and ethanol treated animals p>.05 (unpaired t-test). Error bars denote the ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359156&req=5

pone.0120356.g002: A. Representative nissl stained coronal sections of saline treated and ethanol treated seven weeks post traumatic brain injury.The arrows indicate the location of the lesion. B. Lesion size expressed as a percent of the unlesioned hemisphere. No significant difference was found between saline and ethanol treated animals p>.05 (unpaired t-test). Error bars denote the ± SEM.
Mentions: TBI lesion size was quantified at the end of the behavioral testing (Fig. 2) and taken together with the exhibited behavioral deficits indicated a mild to moderate TBI in all animals. No statistically significant difference was found between groups (9.9% ± 2.0 in ethanol treated rats vs. 8.7% ± 1.4 in saline treated rats, unpaired t-test, p>.05).

Bottom Line: A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury.Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured.We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury. Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured. Our objective was to determine the consequences of a binge paradigm of alcohol intoxication at the time of TBI on long-term functional outcome using a sensitive test of sensorimotor function. We trained adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats on the skilled forelimb reaching task and then administered a single binge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) or saline for three consecutive days (for a total of 3 doses). One hour after the final ethanol dose, rats underwent a TBI to the sensorimotor cortex corresponding to the preferred reaching forelimb. Animals were then tested for seven weeks on the skilled forelimb reaching task to assess the profile of recovery. We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group. Therefore, even a relatively short (3 day) episode of binge alcohol exposure can negatively impact long-term recovery from a TBI, underscoring this significant public health problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus