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Binge ethanol prior to traumatic brain injury worsens sensorimotor functional recovery in rats.

Vaagenes IC, Tsai SY, Ton ST, Husak VA, McGuire SO, O'Brien TE, Kartje GL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury.Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured.We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury. Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured. Our objective was to determine the consequences of a binge paradigm of alcohol intoxication at the time of TBI on long-term functional outcome using a sensitive test of sensorimotor function. We trained adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats on the skilled forelimb reaching task and then administered a single binge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) or saline for three consecutive days (for a total of 3 doses). One hour after the final ethanol dose, rats underwent a TBI to the sensorimotor cortex corresponding to the preferred reaching forelimb. Animals were then tested for seven weeks on the skilled forelimb reaching task to assess the profile of recovery. We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group. Therefore, even a relatively short (3 day) episode of binge alcohol exposure can negatively impact long-term recovery from a TBI, underscoring this significant public health problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Experimental design schematic.B. Representative kinematic sequence of a non-injured rat during the skilled reaching task. C. Fitted curves of the estimated group-level logistic recovery for rats given either three doses of binge ethanol (2g/kg) or vehicle control prior to TBI. The group differences in the midpoint (γ) and asymptote (α) of recovery were found to be statistically significant (p<.05).
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pone.0120356.g001: A. Experimental design schematic.B. Representative kinematic sequence of a non-injured rat during the skilled reaching task. C. Fitted curves of the estimated group-level logistic recovery for rats given either three doses of binge ethanol (2g/kg) or vehicle control prior to TBI. The group differences in the midpoint (γ) and asymptote (α) of recovery were found to be statistically significant (p<.05).

Mentions: To examine complex sensorimotor forelimb function, the skilled forelimb reaching test was used (Fig. 1B), as previously designed [14]. Briefly, rats were weighed and placed in a Plexiglas chamber (30x36x30 cm) with a small rectangular opening (1.5 x 3 cm) on one wall with an external shelf underneath the opening. Rats were trained to reach through the opening for pellets placed on the shelf. A single trial consisted of 20 sugar pellets (45 mg; BioServ, Flemington, NJ) placed successively on the shelf. A successful reach was defined as one in which the animal, in one attempt, reached through the opening, grasped the pellet, and brought it back to its mouth. During the course of training, limb preference was first determined for each animal. Rats were trained to a baseline success rate of 14 out of 20 successful reaches using the preferred forelimb. Once baseline scores were achieved, the animal received a TBI to the sensorimotor cortical area corresponding to the preferred forelimb, resulting in impairment on this task. Animals were tested Mon-Fri for seven weeks post-TBI and sessions were video recorded for further analysis.


Binge ethanol prior to traumatic brain injury worsens sensorimotor functional recovery in rats.

Vaagenes IC, Tsai SY, Ton ST, Husak VA, McGuire SO, O'Brien TE, Kartje GL - PLoS ONE (2015)

A. Experimental design schematic.B. Representative kinematic sequence of a non-injured rat during the skilled reaching task. C. Fitted curves of the estimated group-level logistic recovery for rats given either three doses of binge ethanol (2g/kg) or vehicle control prior to TBI. The group differences in the midpoint (γ) and asymptote (α) of recovery were found to be statistically significant (p<.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359156&req=5

pone.0120356.g001: A. Experimental design schematic.B. Representative kinematic sequence of a non-injured rat during the skilled reaching task. C. Fitted curves of the estimated group-level logistic recovery for rats given either three doses of binge ethanol (2g/kg) or vehicle control prior to TBI. The group differences in the midpoint (γ) and asymptote (α) of recovery were found to be statistically significant (p<.05).
Mentions: To examine complex sensorimotor forelimb function, the skilled forelimb reaching test was used (Fig. 1B), as previously designed [14]. Briefly, rats were weighed and placed in a Plexiglas chamber (30x36x30 cm) with a small rectangular opening (1.5 x 3 cm) on one wall with an external shelf underneath the opening. Rats were trained to reach through the opening for pellets placed on the shelf. A single trial consisted of 20 sugar pellets (45 mg; BioServ, Flemington, NJ) placed successively on the shelf. A successful reach was defined as one in which the animal, in one attempt, reached through the opening, grasped the pellet, and brought it back to its mouth. During the course of training, limb preference was first determined for each animal. Rats were trained to a baseline success rate of 14 out of 20 successful reaches using the preferred forelimb. Once baseline scores were achieved, the animal received a TBI to the sensorimotor cortical area corresponding to the preferred forelimb, resulting in impairment on this task. Animals were tested Mon-Fri for seven weeks post-TBI and sessions were video recorded for further analysis.

Bottom Line: A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury.Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured.We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A significant number of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a high blood alcohol level at the time of injury. Furthermore, drinking alcohol in a binge-like pattern is now recognized as a national problem, leading to a greater likelihood of being injured. Our objective was to determine the consequences of a binge paradigm of alcohol intoxication at the time of TBI on long-term functional outcome using a sensitive test of sensorimotor function. We trained adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats on the skilled forelimb reaching task and then administered a single binge dose of ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) or saline for three consecutive days (for a total of 3 doses). One hour after the final ethanol dose, rats underwent a TBI to the sensorimotor cortex corresponding to the preferred reaching forelimb. Animals were then tested for seven weeks on the skilled forelimb reaching task to assess the profile of recovery. We found that the group given ethanol prior to TBI displayed a slower recovery curve with a lower recovery plateau as compared to the control group. Therefore, even a relatively short (3 day) episode of binge alcohol exposure can negatively impact long-term recovery from a TBI, underscoring this significant public health problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus