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Effect of temperature on biochemical composition, growth and reproduction of the ornamental red cherry shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda (Decapoda, Caridea).

Tropea C, Stumpf L, López Greco LS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: These results suggest growth was delayed at 24 °C, but only for 30 days after hatching.During the growth period, shrimps reached sexual maturity and mated, with the highest proportion of ovigerous females occurring at 28 °C.All the females that matured and mated at 32 °C lost their eggs, indicating a potentially stressful effect of high temperature on ovarian maturation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology of Reproduction and Growth in Crustaceans, Department of Biodiversity and Experimental Biology, FCEyN, University of Buenos Aires, Cdad. Univ. C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; IBBEA, CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
The effect of water temperature on biochemical composition, growth and reproduction of the ornamental shrimp, Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda, was investigated to determine the optimum temperature for its culture. The effect of embryo incubation temperature on the subsequent performance of juveniles was also evaluated. Ovigerous females and recently hatched juveniles (JI) were maintained during egg incubation and for a 90-day period, respectively, at three temperatures (24, 28 and 32 °C). Incubation period increased with decreasing water temperature, but the number and size of JI were similar among treatments. At day 30 of the 90-day period, body weight and growth increment (GI) at 24 °C were lower than those at 28 and 32 °C. On subsequent days, GI at 24 °C exceeded that at 28 and 32 °C, leading to a similar body weight among treatments. These results suggest growth was delayed at 24 °C, but only for 30 days after hatching. The lipid concentration tended to be lowest, intermediate and highest at 28, 32 and 24 °C, respectively, possibly as a consequence of the metabolic processes involved in growth and ovarian maturation. Protein and glycogen concentrations were similar among treatments. Both the growth trajectory and biochemical composition of shrimps were affected by the temperature experienced during the 90-day growth period independently of the embryo incubation temperature. During the growth period, shrimps reached sexual maturity and mated, with the highest proportion of ovigerous females occurring at 28 °C. All the females that matured and mated at 32 °C lost their eggs, indicating a potentially stressful effect of high temperature on ovarian maturation. Based on high survival and good growth performance of shrimps at the three temperatures tested over the 90-day period it is concluded that N. heteropoda heteropoda is tolerant to a wide range of water temperatures, with 28 °C being the optimum temperature for its culture.

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Relationship between actual fecundity and female weight (A) and between juvenile initial cephalothorax length and actual fecundity (B).Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda females were kept at three different water temperatures (24, 28 or 32°C) over the incubation period, from the spawning day to the hatching day. The number of females per treatment was 19 at 24°C, 26 at 28°C and 20 at 32°C. No statistical relationships were found between the variables analyzed (P > 0.05).
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pone.0119468.g002: Relationship between actual fecundity and female weight (A) and between juvenile initial cephalothorax length and actual fecundity (B).Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda females were kept at three different water temperatures (24, 28 or 32°C) over the incubation period, from the spawning day to the hatching day. The number of females per treatment was 19 at 24°C, 26 at 28°C and 20 at 32°C. No statistical relationships were found between the variables analyzed (P > 0.05).

Mentions: The variables recorded in the Incubation period of Exp. 1 (weight and survival of ovigerous females, duration of the incubation period, actual fecundity, cephalothorax length and body weight of JI) were compared among temperature treatments (24, 28 and 32°C) using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Some variables recorded in the Growth period of Exp. 1 and Exp. 2 (initial and final cephalothorax lengths, survival, and biochemical composition of shrimps, and the proportion of females/males) were also compared among treatments using one-way ANOVA. To account for multiple testing, we used the Bonferroni correction and considered significant only those comparisons for which P < 0.05/11 = 0.005, with 11 being the total number of ANOVAs performed. This correction is known to be conservative and thus “over-corrected” the raw P values. In addition, linear regression was used to analyze actual fecundity versus maternal weight and cephalothorax length of JI versus actual fecundity. Repeated measures one-way ANOVA was performed to test for differences in body weight and GI among treatments, followed by the multiple comparison LSD Fisher test when significant differences were found. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the percentage of growth-phase ovigerous females among treatments. The replicate unit was each ovigerous female (for the female weight and survival in the Incubation period), and each brood (for the cephalothorax length and weight of JI in the Incubation period, the initial and final cephalothorax lengths, initial and final weights, GI, survival, and biochemical composition of shrimps, and the proportion of females/males in the Growth period). The number of replicates per treatment for each variable is given in Table 1 and Fig. 2. The results per treatment are presented as mean ± SE. All tests were carried out with STATISTICA version 8.0 [31].


Effect of temperature on biochemical composition, growth and reproduction of the ornamental red cherry shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda (Decapoda, Caridea).

Tropea C, Stumpf L, López Greco LS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between actual fecundity and female weight (A) and between juvenile initial cephalothorax length and actual fecundity (B).Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda females were kept at three different water temperatures (24, 28 or 32°C) over the incubation period, from the spawning day to the hatching day. The number of females per treatment was 19 at 24°C, 26 at 28°C and 20 at 32°C. No statistical relationships were found between the variables analyzed (P > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359132&req=5

pone.0119468.g002: Relationship between actual fecundity and female weight (A) and between juvenile initial cephalothorax length and actual fecundity (B).Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda females were kept at three different water temperatures (24, 28 or 32°C) over the incubation period, from the spawning day to the hatching day. The number of females per treatment was 19 at 24°C, 26 at 28°C and 20 at 32°C. No statistical relationships were found between the variables analyzed (P > 0.05).
Mentions: The variables recorded in the Incubation period of Exp. 1 (weight and survival of ovigerous females, duration of the incubation period, actual fecundity, cephalothorax length and body weight of JI) were compared among temperature treatments (24, 28 and 32°C) using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Some variables recorded in the Growth period of Exp. 1 and Exp. 2 (initial and final cephalothorax lengths, survival, and biochemical composition of shrimps, and the proportion of females/males) were also compared among treatments using one-way ANOVA. To account for multiple testing, we used the Bonferroni correction and considered significant only those comparisons for which P < 0.05/11 = 0.005, with 11 being the total number of ANOVAs performed. This correction is known to be conservative and thus “over-corrected” the raw P values. In addition, linear regression was used to analyze actual fecundity versus maternal weight and cephalothorax length of JI versus actual fecundity. Repeated measures one-way ANOVA was performed to test for differences in body weight and GI among treatments, followed by the multiple comparison LSD Fisher test when significant differences were found. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the percentage of growth-phase ovigerous females among treatments. The replicate unit was each ovigerous female (for the female weight and survival in the Incubation period), and each brood (for the cephalothorax length and weight of JI in the Incubation period, the initial and final cephalothorax lengths, initial and final weights, GI, survival, and biochemical composition of shrimps, and the proportion of females/males in the Growth period). The number of replicates per treatment for each variable is given in Table 1 and Fig. 2. The results per treatment are presented as mean ± SE. All tests were carried out with STATISTICA version 8.0 [31].

Bottom Line: These results suggest growth was delayed at 24 °C, but only for 30 days after hatching.During the growth period, shrimps reached sexual maturity and mated, with the highest proportion of ovigerous females occurring at 28 °C.All the females that matured and mated at 32 °C lost their eggs, indicating a potentially stressful effect of high temperature on ovarian maturation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology of Reproduction and Growth in Crustaceans, Department of Biodiversity and Experimental Biology, FCEyN, University of Buenos Aires, Cdad. Univ. C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; IBBEA, CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
The effect of water temperature on biochemical composition, growth and reproduction of the ornamental shrimp, Neocaridina heteropoda heteropoda, was investigated to determine the optimum temperature for its culture. The effect of embryo incubation temperature on the subsequent performance of juveniles was also evaluated. Ovigerous females and recently hatched juveniles (JI) were maintained during egg incubation and for a 90-day period, respectively, at three temperatures (24, 28 and 32 °C). Incubation period increased with decreasing water temperature, but the number and size of JI were similar among treatments. At day 30 of the 90-day period, body weight and growth increment (GI) at 24 °C were lower than those at 28 and 32 °C. On subsequent days, GI at 24 °C exceeded that at 28 and 32 °C, leading to a similar body weight among treatments. These results suggest growth was delayed at 24 °C, but only for 30 days after hatching. The lipid concentration tended to be lowest, intermediate and highest at 28, 32 and 24 °C, respectively, possibly as a consequence of the metabolic processes involved in growth and ovarian maturation. Protein and glycogen concentrations were similar among treatments. Both the growth trajectory and biochemical composition of shrimps were affected by the temperature experienced during the 90-day growth period independently of the embryo incubation temperature. During the growth period, shrimps reached sexual maturity and mated, with the highest proportion of ovigerous females occurring at 28 °C. All the females that matured and mated at 32 °C lost their eggs, indicating a potentially stressful effect of high temperature on ovarian maturation. Based on high survival and good growth performance of shrimps at the three temperatures tested over the 90-day period it is concluded that N. heteropoda heteropoda is tolerant to a wide range of water temperatures, with 28 °C being the optimum temperature for its culture.

Show MeSH