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Fishery induces sperm depletion and reduction in male reproductive potential for crab species under male-biased harvest strategy.

Pardo LM, Rosas Y, Fuentes JP, Riveros MP, Chaparro OR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A manipulative experiment was performed in the laboratory to estimate vasa deferentia weight and VSI from just-mated males in order to obtain a reference point for the potential effects of the fishery on sperm reserves.Sperm storage capacity is significantly affected by fisheries; during the mating season vasa deferentia from localities with low fishery intensity were heavier than those from high intensity fisheries, and these differences were even more evident in large males.Males from localities with high fishery intensity showed little capacity to recover sperm reserves and the VSI of these males remained below the values of the just-mated males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Sperm depletion in males can occur when polygynous species are intensively exploited under a male-biased management strategy. In fisheries involving crabs species, the effects of this type of management on the reproductive potential is far from being understood. This study tests whether male-biased management of the principal Chilean crab fishery is able to affect the potential capacity of Metacarcinus edwardsii males to transfer sperm to females. Five localities in southern Chile, recording contrasting crab fishery landing, were selected to assess the potential of sperm depletion triggered by fishery. Seasonally, male crabs from each locality were obtained. Dry weight and histological condition of vasa deferentia and the Vaso-Somatic Index (VSI) were determined in order to use them as proxies for sperm depletion and male reproductive condition. A manipulative experiment was performed in the laboratory to estimate vasa deferentia weight and VSI from just-mated males in order to obtain a reference point for the potential effects of the fishery on sperm reserves. Sperm storage capacity is significantly affected by fisheries; during the mating season vasa deferentia from localities with low fishery intensity were heavier than those from high intensity fisheries, and these differences were even more evident in large males. Histological section showed that this disparity in vasa deferentia weight was explained principally by differences in the quantity of spermatophores rather than other seminal material. VSI was always higher in males from localities with low fishery intensity. Males from localities with high fishery intensity showed little capacity to recover sperm reserves and the VSI of these males remained below the values of the just-mated males. Detriment in the capacity of males to transfer sperm is the first step to sperm limitation in an exploited population, thus detection of sperm depletion can be an alert to introduce changes in the current management of crabs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean carapace width by sex of legal sized crab (>110 mm) determined from subtidal dive transect (15 m) by locality.Los Molinos and Calbuco are categorized as low fishery intensity and Ancud, Dalcahue and Quellon are categorized as high fishery intensity. All seasons pooled. Bars represent standard errors.
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pone.0115525.g003: Mean carapace width by sex of legal sized crab (>110 mm) determined from subtidal dive transect (15 m) by locality.Los Molinos and Calbuco are categorized as low fishery intensity and Ancud, Dalcahue and Quellon are categorized as high fishery intensity. All seasons pooled. Bars represent standard errors.

Mentions: With respect to crab size, males were larger than females in Calbuco, Los Molinos and Dalcahue (Duncan post hoc test; p<0.001), however at Ancud and Quellon both sexes had non-significant differences in size (Duncan post hoc test; p = 0.4 and 0.2 respectively). Males from Los Molinos were larger than in all other localities (Duncan post hoc test; p< 0.05), except Dalcahue (Duncan post hoc test; p = 0.1) (Fig. 3).


Fishery induces sperm depletion and reduction in male reproductive potential for crab species under male-biased harvest strategy.

Pardo LM, Rosas Y, Fuentes JP, Riveros MP, Chaparro OR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean carapace width by sex of legal sized crab (>110 mm) determined from subtidal dive transect (15 m) by locality.Los Molinos and Calbuco are categorized as low fishery intensity and Ancud, Dalcahue and Quellon are categorized as high fishery intensity. All seasons pooled. Bars represent standard errors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359117&req=5

pone.0115525.g003: Mean carapace width by sex of legal sized crab (>110 mm) determined from subtidal dive transect (15 m) by locality.Los Molinos and Calbuco are categorized as low fishery intensity and Ancud, Dalcahue and Quellon are categorized as high fishery intensity. All seasons pooled. Bars represent standard errors.
Mentions: With respect to crab size, males were larger than females in Calbuco, Los Molinos and Dalcahue (Duncan post hoc test; p<0.001), however at Ancud and Quellon both sexes had non-significant differences in size (Duncan post hoc test; p = 0.4 and 0.2 respectively). Males from Los Molinos were larger than in all other localities (Duncan post hoc test; p< 0.05), except Dalcahue (Duncan post hoc test; p = 0.1) (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: A manipulative experiment was performed in the laboratory to estimate vasa deferentia weight and VSI from just-mated males in order to obtain a reference point for the potential effects of the fishery on sperm reserves.Sperm storage capacity is significantly affected by fisheries; during the mating season vasa deferentia from localities with low fishery intensity were heavier than those from high intensity fisheries, and these differences were even more evident in large males.Males from localities with high fishery intensity showed little capacity to recover sperm reserves and the VSI of these males remained below the values of the just-mated males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Sperm depletion in males can occur when polygynous species are intensively exploited under a male-biased management strategy. In fisheries involving crabs species, the effects of this type of management on the reproductive potential is far from being understood. This study tests whether male-biased management of the principal Chilean crab fishery is able to affect the potential capacity of Metacarcinus edwardsii males to transfer sperm to females. Five localities in southern Chile, recording contrasting crab fishery landing, were selected to assess the potential of sperm depletion triggered by fishery. Seasonally, male crabs from each locality were obtained. Dry weight and histological condition of vasa deferentia and the Vaso-Somatic Index (VSI) were determined in order to use them as proxies for sperm depletion and male reproductive condition. A manipulative experiment was performed in the laboratory to estimate vasa deferentia weight and VSI from just-mated males in order to obtain a reference point for the potential effects of the fishery on sperm reserves. Sperm storage capacity is significantly affected by fisheries; during the mating season vasa deferentia from localities with low fishery intensity were heavier than those from high intensity fisheries, and these differences were even more evident in large males. Histological section showed that this disparity in vasa deferentia weight was explained principally by differences in the quantity of spermatophores rather than other seminal material. VSI was always higher in males from localities with low fishery intensity. Males from localities with high fishery intensity showed little capacity to recover sperm reserves and the VSI of these males remained below the values of the just-mated males. Detriment in the capacity of males to transfer sperm is the first step to sperm limitation in an exploited population, thus detection of sperm depletion can be an alert to introduce changes in the current management of crabs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus