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Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Zaidi SH, Smith-Morris C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition.In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease.These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, University of California, School of Public Health, Berkeley, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Pakistan.
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pone.0119069.g001: Map of Pakistan.

Mentions: Located twenty miles from the Afghan border, Peshawar, Pakistan is filled with refugees that fled to Pakistan during the Soviet War of the 1980’s and the current war in Afghanistan (Fig. 1). The devastating floods of 2010 in Pakistan also displaced a large population of people that are now living in Peshawar. Peshawar is the provincial capital of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. Its neighborhoods range from refugee encampments to urban dwellings. This unique and diverse population is of low socioeconomic status and comprises a significantly underserved area. There are biomedical, local, and government based health care resources, although biomedicine is broadly regarded as the most effective. This combination of factors made Peshawar an excellent site for understanding cultural and contextual factors in treatment and control of child gastroenteritis.


Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Zaidi SH, Smith-Morris C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Map of Pakistan.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359116&req=5

pone.0119069.g001: Map of Pakistan.
Mentions: Located twenty miles from the Afghan border, Peshawar, Pakistan is filled with refugees that fled to Pakistan during the Soviet War of the 1980’s and the current war in Afghanistan (Fig. 1). The devastating floods of 2010 in Pakistan also displaced a large population of people that are now living in Peshawar. Peshawar is the provincial capital of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. Its neighborhoods range from refugee encampments to urban dwellings. This unique and diverse population is of low socioeconomic status and comprises a significantly underserved area. There are biomedical, local, and government based health care resources, although biomedicine is broadly regarded as the most effective. This combination of factors made Peshawar an excellent site for understanding cultural and contextual factors in treatment and control of child gastroenteritis.

Bottom Line: Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition.In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease.These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, University of California, School of Public Health, Berkeley, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus