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Differential contribution of soil biota groups to plant litter decomposition as mediated by soil use.

Castro-Huerta RA, Falco LB, Sandler RV, Coviella CE - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Differences were found for the different biota groups, and they were dependant on soil use.Within systems, the results show that in the naturalized grasslands, the macrofauna had the highest contribution to decomposition.These results underscore the relative importance and activity of the different groups of the edaphic biota and the effects of different soil uses on soil biota activity.

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Affiliation: Ecology Laboratory, Terrestrial Ecology Research Program, Basic Sciences Department-Ecology and Sustainable Development Institute, National University of Luján , Luján, Buenos Aires , Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Plant decomposition is dependant on the activity of the soil biota and its interactions with climate, soil properties, and plant residue inputs. This work assessed the roles of different groups of the soil biota on litter decomposition, and the way they are modulated by soil use. Litterbags of different mesh sizes for the selective exclusion of soil fauna by size (macro, meso, and microfauna) were filled with standardized dried leaves and placed on the same soil under different use intensities: naturalized grasslands, recent agriculture, and intensive agriculture fields. During five months, litterbags of each mesh size were collected once a month per system with five replicates. The remaining mass was measured and decomposition rates calculated. Differences were found for the different biota groups, and they were dependant on soil use. Within systems, the results show that in the naturalized grasslands, the macrofauna had the highest contribution to decomposition. In the recent agricultural system it was the combined activity of the macro- and mesofauna, and in the intensive agricultural use it was the mesofauna activity. These results underscore the relative importance and activity of the different groups of the edaphic biota and the effects of different soil uses on soil biota activity.

No MeSH data available.


Remaining mass results for the Microfauna.Results for remaining mass (%) found for the Microfauna when compared across treatments; Decomposition rate due to Microfauna activity is higher in the less anthropized system when compared to both agricultural ones. No significant differences were found for the Macro- or the Mesofauna across systems. Data shown as in Fig. 2.
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fig-5: Remaining mass results for the Microfauna.Results for remaining mass (%) found for the Microfauna when compared across treatments; Decomposition rate due to Microfauna activity is higher in the less anthropized system when compared to both agricultural ones. No significant differences were found for the Macro- or the Mesofauna across systems. Data shown as in Fig. 2.

Mentions: When analyzed between systems, the only significant difference found in decomposition rate was for the Microfauna. Decomposition rate for this group was significantly higher in the less disturbed system (NG) when compared to the two agricultural systems (Fig. 5).


Differential contribution of soil biota groups to plant litter decomposition as mediated by soil use.

Castro-Huerta RA, Falco LB, Sandler RV, Coviella CE - PeerJ (2015)

Remaining mass results for the Microfauna.Results for remaining mass (%) found for the Microfauna when compared across treatments; Decomposition rate due to Microfauna activity is higher in the less anthropized system when compared to both agricultural ones. No significant differences were found for the Macro- or the Mesofauna across systems. Data shown as in Fig. 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359044&req=5

fig-5: Remaining mass results for the Microfauna.Results for remaining mass (%) found for the Microfauna when compared across treatments; Decomposition rate due to Microfauna activity is higher in the less anthropized system when compared to both agricultural ones. No significant differences were found for the Macro- or the Mesofauna across systems. Data shown as in Fig. 2.
Mentions: When analyzed between systems, the only significant difference found in decomposition rate was for the Microfauna. Decomposition rate for this group was significantly higher in the less disturbed system (NG) when compared to the two agricultural systems (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Differences were found for the different biota groups, and they were dependant on soil use.Within systems, the results show that in the naturalized grasslands, the macrofauna had the highest contribution to decomposition.These results underscore the relative importance and activity of the different groups of the edaphic biota and the effects of different soil uses on soil biota activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecology Laboratory, Terrestrial Ecology Research Program, Basic Sciences Department-Ecology and Sustainable Development Institute, National University of Luján , Luján, Buenos Aires , Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Plant decomposition is dependant on the activity of the soil biota and its interactions with climate, soil properties, and plant residue inputs. This work assessed the roles of different groups of the soil biota on litter decomposition, and the way they are modulated by soil use. Litterbags of different mesh sizes for the selective exclusion of soil fauna by size (macro, meso, and microfauna) were filled with standardized dried leaves and placed on the same soil under different use intensities: naturalized grasslands, recent agriculture, and intensive agriculture fields. During five months, litterbags of each mesh size were collected once a month per system with five replicates. The remaining mass was measured and decomposition rates calculated. Differences were found for the different biota groups, and they were dependant on soil use. Within systems, the results show that in the naturalized grasslands, the macrofauna had the highest contribution to decomposition. In the recent agricultural system it was the combined activity of the macro- and mesofauna, and in the intensive agricultural use it was the mesofauna activity. These results underscore the relative importance and activity of the different groups of the edaphic biota and the effects of different soil uses on soil biota activity.

No MeSH data available.