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Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment.

Manser A, König B, Lindholm AK - J. Evol. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: This approach enabled us to analyse female behaviour during the testing period, and the resulting paternity success and fitness consequences of a given choice.We show that genetic incompatibilities arising from the t haplotype had severe indirect fitness consequences and t females avoided fertilization by t incompatible males.The results are inconclusive whether this avoidance of t fertilization by t females was caused by pre- or post-copulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

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(a) Behavioural preference for t males Bi as a function of maternal genotype including mean and 95% confidence interval estimates. The dashed horizontal line depicts the  hypothesis, that is no choice (Bi = 0.5). (b) Paternity share of t males Fi as a function of behavioural preference Bi. The colour of the dots represent female genotype (white: t, dark-grey: w). The histograms at the figure margins depict the distribution of the data in both x- and y-direction, illustrating that nearly uniformly distributed behavioural preference Bi translate into clear fertilization biases Fi. Dotted and solid lines show expected paternity shares for t and w females, respectively, based on  model 3. It is assumed that a female's behavioural preference Bi is proportional to the number of matings as well as the number of competing sperm of a given male. For example, if Bi = 0.5, both males contribute equally to the competing sperm pool. However – according to  model 3 – a proportion 1−1/(2τ) of a t male's sperm is dysfunctional.
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fig04: (a) Behavioural preference for t males Bi as a function of maternal genotype including mean and 95% confidence interval estimates. The dashed horizontal line depicts the hypothesis, that is no choice (Bi = 0.5). (b) Paternity share of t males Fi as a function of behavioural preference Bi. The colour of the dots represent female genotype (white: t, dark-grey: w). The histograms at the figure margins depict the distribution of the data in both x- and y-direction, illustrating that nearly uniformly distributed behavioural preference Bi translate into clear fertilization biases Fi. Dotted and solid lines show expected paternity shares for t and w females, respectively, based on model 3. It is assumed that a female's behavioural preference Bi is proportional to the number of matings as well as the number of competing sperm of a given male. For example, if Bi = 0.5, both males contribute equally to the competing sperm pool. However – according to model 3 – a proportion 1−1/(2τ) of a t male's sperm is dysfunctional.

Mentions: The software recording of female behaviour was available for 71 choice tests, of which data from 36 tests had to be discarded due to technical problems in the recording of the data (Table 1). For the remaining 35 tests, a total 6 414 744 log entries accumulated. Females visited either male cage on average 84.4 ± 44.8 (mean ± SD) times per day. Average visit duration was 9.52 ± 9.48 min. They spent 37.27 ± 17.14% of their time in a male's cage (see also Figure S1). Figure 4a shows behavioural preferences for the t male for t and w females. According to the linear mixed effects model using a logit-transformation, the 95% confidence bands of did not fall outside the no choice predictions (Bi = 0.5) both in t females (95% CI: [0.10, 0.64]) and w females (95% CI: [0.16, 0.75]).


Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment.

Manser A, König B, Lindholm AK - J. Evol. Biol. (2014)

(a) Behavioural preference for t males Bi as a function of maternal genotype including mean and 95% confidence interval estimates. The dashed horizontal line depicts the  hypothesis, that is no choice (Bi = 0.5). (b) Paternity share of t males Fi as a function of behavioural preference Bi. The colour of the dots represent female genotype (white: t, dark-grey: w). The histograms at the figure margins depict the distribution of the data in both x- and y-direction, illustrating that nearly uniformly distributed behavioural preference Bi translate into clear fertilization biases Fi. Dotted and solid lines show expected paternity shares for t and w females, respectively, based on  model 3. It is assumed that a female's behavioural preference Bi is proportional to the number of matings as well as the number of competing sperm of a given male. For example, if Bi = 0.5, both males contribute equally to the competing sperm pool. However – according to  model 3 – a proportion 1−1/(2τ) of a t male's sperm is dysfunctional.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359040&req=5

fig04: (a) Behavioural preference for t males Bi as a function of maternal genotype including mean and 95% confidence interval estimates. The dashed horizontal line depicts the hypothesis, that is no choice (Bi = 0.5). (b) Paternity share of t males Fi as a function of behavioural preference Bi. The colour of the dots represent female genotype (white: t, dark-grey: w). The histograms at the figure margins depict the distribution of the data in both x- and y-direction, illustrating that nearly uniformly distributed behavioural preference Bi translate into clear fertilization biases Fi. Dotted and solid lines show expected paternity shares for t and w females, respectively, based on model 3. It is assumed that a female's behavioural preference Bi is proportional to the number of matings as well as the number of competing sperm of a given male. For example, if Bi = 0.5, both males contribute equally to the competing sperm pool. However – according to model 3 – a proportion 1−1/(2τ) of a t male's sperm is dysfunctional.
Mentions: The software recording of female behaviour was available for 71 choice tests, of which data from 36 tests had to be discarded due to technical problems in the recording of the data (Table 1). For the remaining 35 tests, a total 6 414 744 log entries accumulated. Females visited either male cage on average 84.4 ± 44.8 (mean ± SD) times per day. Average visit duration was 9.52 ± 9.48 min. They spent 37.27 ± 17.14% of their time in a male's cage (see also Figure S1). Figure 4a shows behavioural preferences for the t male for t and w females. According to the linear mixed effects model using a logit-transformation, the 95% confidence bands of did not fall outside the no choice predictions (Bi = 0.5) both in t females (95% CI: [0.10, 0.64]) and w females (95% CI: [0.16, 0.75]).

Bottom Line: This approach enabled us to analyse female behaviour during the testing period, and the resulting paternity success and fitness consequences of a given choice.We show that genetic incompatibilities arising from the t haplotype had severe indirect fitness consequences and t females avoided fertilization by t incompatible males.The results are inconclusive whether this avoidance of t fertilization by t females was caused by pre- or post-copulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Show MeSH