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Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment.

Manser A, König B, Lindholm AK - J. Evol. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: This approach enabled us to analyse female behaviour during the testing period, and the resulting paternity success and fitness consequences of a given choice.We show that genetic incompatibilities arising from the t haplotype had severe indirect fitness consequences and t females avoided fertilization by t incompatible males.The results are inconclusive whether this avoidance of t fertilization by t females was caused by pre- or post-copulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

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Scheme of choice device with the three cages (A–C), four doors (I–IV), four antennae (i–iv) and their corresponding readers (1–4). Males were confined to cages A and C, respectively. The female had access to all three cages.
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fig01: Scheme of choice device with the three cages (A–C), four doors (I–IV), four antennae (i–iv) and their corresponding readers (1–4). Males were confined to cages A and C, respectively. The female had access to all three cages.

Mentions: An elaborate choice device developed in our group (Rüsch, 2002) was used to assess female mating strategy (see Fig. 1). The device consisted of three Macrolon II cages (A–C) connected with tunnels separated by doors. Only the female was allowed free access to all three cages (A–C). Males on the other hand were confined to their own, outer cages (A and C). To achieve this, all individuals used in the experiment were tagged individually with transponders (glastag micro read only, article no. 860-0220; IQ Automation GmbH, Eching, Germany). Transponders were recognized by specific readers (1–4, easy key Standalone module, article no. A402-0031; IQ Automation GmbH) over antennae that were wound manually around the tunnels at positions (i)–(iv). Each of these readers was further connected to specific doors (readers 1 and 4 to doors I and IV, respectively, and readers 2 and 3 to doors I + II and III + IV, respectively). Readers were specifically programmed to open/close the associated doors after the recognition of transponder numbers of choice. Free female movement (a) and male confinement to their own cage (b) were guaranteed by the following settings.


Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment.

Manser A, König B, Lindholm AK - J. Evol. Biol. (2014)

Scheme of choice device with the three cages (A–C), four doors (I–IV), four antennae (i–iv) and their corresponding readers (1–4). Males were confined to cages A and C, respectively. The female had access to all three cages.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4359040&req=5

fig01: Scheme of choice device with the three cages (A–C), four doors (I–IV), four antennae (i–iv) and their corresponding readers (1–4). Males were confined to cages A and C, respectively. The female had access to all three cages.
Mentions: An elaborate choice device developed in our group (Rüsch, 2002) was used to assess female mating strategy (see Fig. 1). The device consisted of three Macrolon II cages (A–C) connected with tunnels separated by doors. Only the female was allowed free access to all three cages (A–C). Males on the other hand were confined to their own, outer cages (A and C). To achieve this, all individuals used in the experiment were tagged individually with transponders (glastag micro read only, article no. 860-0220; IQ Automation GmbH, Eching, Germany). Transponders were recognized by specific readers (1–4, easy key Standalone module, article no. A402-0031; IQ Automation GmbH) over antennae that were wound manually around the tunnels at positions (i)–(iv). Each of these readers was further connected to specific doors (readers 1 and 4 to doors I and IV, respectively, and readers 2 and 3 to doors I + II and III + IV, respectively). Readers were specifically programmed to open/close the associated doors after the recognition of transponder numbers of choice. Free female movement (a) and male confinement to their own cage (b) were guaranteed by the following settings.

Bottom Line: This approach enabled us to analyse female behaviour during the testing period, and the resulting paternity success and fitness consequences of a given choice.We show that genetic incompatibilities arising from the t haplotype had severe indirect fitness consequences and t females avoided fertilization by t incompatible males.The results are inconclusive whether this avoidance of t fertilization by t females was caused by pre- or post-copulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Show MeSH