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Surgical experience of adult primary hepatic sarcomas.

Lin YH, Lin CC, Concejero AM, Yong CC, Kuo FY, Wang CC - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively.Importantly, the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of non-angiosarcoma patients were superior to those of angiosarcoma (85.7% vs. 33.3%, 71.4% vs. 16.7%, and 57.1% vs. 0%, respectively, P = 0.023).Angiosarcoma is associated with a more dismal outcome than non-angiosarcoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No. 123, Da-Pei Road, Niao-Sung, Kaohsiung, 83301, Taiwan. adrianlin107@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary hepatic sarcoma (PHS) is a rare primary liver malignancy. The histological types of PHS are diverse, and the clinical outcomes and management mainly depend on the histopathology. This study aims to evaluate the results of surgical intervention.

Methods: Between January 2003 and June 2009, 13 adult patients with pathologically proven PHS were identified by record review. The patients' demographic profile, tumor characteristics, treatment modalities, and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. The end of follow-up was December 2014.

Results: Nine (69%) underwent curative liver resection and two underwent liver transplantation; the others received non-operative treatments. The pathologic findings were six (46%) angiosarcomas, four (30.7%) undifferentiated sarcomas, one (7.6%) leiomyosarcoma, one (7.6%) malignant mesenchymoma, and one (7.6%) hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The median follow-up was 31.4 (2.8 ~ 142.5) months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively. Importantly, the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of non-angiosarcoma patients were superior to those of angiosarcoma (85.7% vs. 33.3%, 71.4% vs. 16.7%, and 57.1% vs. 0%, respectively, P = 0.023).

Conclusions: Surgical intervention provides the possibility of long-term survival from PHS. Angiosarcoma is associated with a more dismal outcome than non-angiosarcoma.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The survival of the angiosarcoma group is significantly worse than the non-angiosarcoma group (P = 0.023).
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Fig1: The survival of the angiosarcoma group is significantly worse than the non-angiosarcoma group (P = 0.023).

Mentions: No patient lost follow-up. The median survival was 31.4 (2.7 ~ 142.5) months at the end of study. The overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 61.5%, 53.8%, and 30.8%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively. All patients with angiosarcoma expired during study time with median survival of 8.9 (2.7 ~ 44.2) months. The patients with non-angiosarcoma PHS were with median survival of 65.4 (8.2 ~ 142.5) months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the angiosarcoma group were 33.3%, 16.7%, and 0%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the non-angiosarcoma group were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 57.1%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the undifferentiated sarcoma group (including undifferentiated sarcoma, embryonal sarcoma, and malignant mesenchymoma) were 80%, 60%, and 60%, respectively. The survival of non-angiosarcoma patients was significantly superior to those of angiosarcoma (P = 0.023) (Figure 1).Figure 1


Surgical experience of adult primary hepatic sarcomas.

Lin YH, Lin CC, Concejero AM, Yong CC, Kuo FY, Wang CC - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

The survival of the angiosarcoma group is significantly worse than the non-angiosarcoma group (P = 0.023).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358880&req=5

Fig1: The survival of the angiosarcoma group is significantly worse than the non-angiosarcoma group (P = 0.023).
Mentions: No patient lost follow-up. The median survival was 31.4 (2.7 ~ 142.5) months at the end of study. The overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 61.5%, 53.8%, and 30.8%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively. All patients with angiosarcoma expired during study time with median survival of 8.9 (2.7 ~ 44.2) months. The patients with non-angiosarcoma PHS were with median survival of 65.4 (8.2 ~ 142.5) months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the angiosarcoma group were 33.3%, 16.7%, and 0%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the non-angiosarcoma group were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 57.1%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of the undifferentiated sarcoma group (including undifferentiated sarcoma, embryonal sarcoma, and malignant mesenchymoma) were 80%, 60%, and 60%, respectively. The survival of non-angiosarcoma patients was significantly superior to those of angiosarcoma (P = 0.023) (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively.Importantly, the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of non-angiosarcoma patients were superior to those of angiosarcoma (85.7% vs. 33.3%, 71.4% vs. 16.7%, and 57.1% vs. 0%, respectively, P = 0.023).Angiosarcoma is associated with a more dismal outcome than non-angiosarcoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No. 123, Da-Pei Road, Niao-Sung, Kaohsiung, 83301, Taiwan. adrianlin107@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary hepatic sarcoma (PHS) is a rare primary liver malignancy. The histological types of PHS are diverse, and the clinical outcomes and management mainly depend on the histopathology. This study aims to evaluate the results of surgical intervention.

Methods: Between January 2003 and June 2009, 13 adult patients with pathologically proven PHS were identified by record review. The patients' demographic profile, tumor characteristics, treatment modalities, and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. The end of follow-up was December 2014.

Results: Nine (69%) underwent curative liver resection and two underwent liver transplantation; the others received non-operative treatments. The pathologic findings were six (46%) angiosarcomas, four (30.7%) undifferentiated sarcomas, one (7.6%) leiomyosarcoma, one (7.6%) malignant mesenchymoma, and one (7.6%) hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The median follow-up was 31.4 (2.8 ~ 142.5) months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival of surgical patients were 72.7%, 63.6%, and 36.4%, respectively. Importantly, the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates of non-angiosarcoma patients were superior to those of angiosarcoma (85.7% vs. 33.3%, 71.4% vs. 16.7%, and 57.1% vs. 0%, respectively, P = 0.023).

Conclusions: Surgical intervention provides the possibility of long-term survival from PHS. Angiosarcoma is associated with a more dismal outcome than non-angiosarcoma.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus