Limits...
Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

Scott DL, Ibrahim F, Farewell V, O'Keeffe AG, Walker D, Kelly C, Birrell F, Chakravarty K, Maddison P, Heslin M, Patel A, Kingsley GH - BMJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Initial reductions in disease activity were greater with the biologic strategy, but these differences did not persist beyond six months.Remission was seen in 72 patients (44 with biologic strategy; 36 with alternative strategy); 28 patients had serious adverse events (18 and 10, respectively); six and 10 patients, respectively, stopped treatment because of toxicity.The alternative strategy reduced health and social care costs per patient by £3615 (€4930, $5585) for months 0-6 and £1930 for months 6-12.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, King's College London School of Medicine, London SE5 9RJ, UK d.scott1@nhs.net.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 3 Changes in mean (SE) DAS28 scores (intention to treat analysis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358851&req=5

fig3: Fig 3 Changes in mean (SE) DAS28 scores (intention to treat analysis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors

Mentions: Disease activity fell in both groups (fig 3). Initial falls were greater with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, but with time the differences equalised. Over the whole 12 months the unadjusted difference between groups was 0.48 (95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.79), favouring the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy. The difference was predominantly because of changes in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (appendix table E).


Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

Scott DL, Ibrahim F, Farewell V, O'Keeffe AG, Walker D, Kelly C, Birrell F, Chakravarty K, Maddison P, Heslin M, Patel A, Kingsley GH - BMJ (2015)

Fig 3 Changes in mean (SE) DAS28 scores (intention to treat analysis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358851&req=5

fig3: Fig 3 Changes in mean (SE) DAS28 scores (intention to treat analysis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
Mentions: Disease activity fell in both groups (fig 3). Initial falls were greater with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, but with time the differences equalised. Over the whole 12 months the unadjusted difference between groups was 0.48 (95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.79), favouring the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy. The difference was predominantly because of changes in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (appendix table E).

Bottom Line: Initial reductions in disease activity were greater with the biologic strategy, but these differences did not persist beyond six months.Remission was seen in 72 patients (44 with biologic strategy; 36 with alternative strategy); 28 patients had serious adverse events (18 and 10, respectively); six and 10 patients, respectively, stopped treatment because of toxicity.The alternative strategy reduced health and social care costs per patient by £3615 (€4930, $5585) for months 0-6 and £1930 for months 6-12.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, King's College London School of Medicine, London SE5 9RJ, UK d.scott1@nhs.net.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus