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Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

Scott DL, Ibrahim F, Farewell V, O'Keeffe AG, Walker D, Kelly C, Birrell F, Chakravarty K, Maddison P, Heslin M, Patel A, Kingsley GH - BMJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Initial reductions in disease activity were greater with the biologic strategy, but these differences did not persist beyond six months.Remission was seen in 72 patients (44 with biologic strategy; 36 with alternative strategy); 28 patients had serious adverse events (18 and 10, respectively); six and 10 patients, respectively, stopped treatment because of toxicity.The alternative strategy reduced health and social care costs per patient by £3615 (€4930, $5585) for months 0-6 and £1930 for months 6-12.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, King's College London School of Medicine, London SE5 9RJ, UK d.scott1@nhs.net.

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Fig 1 Consort flowchart of study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
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fig1: Fig 1 Consort flowchart of study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors

Mentions: Between September 2008 and December 2010, we screened 432 patients, randomised 214, and treated 205 (fig 1). Of these 205 treated patients, 147 (72%) completed 12 months of treatment; 16 (8%) were lost to follow-up; 42 (20%) discontinued the intervention and were followed-up; 16 (8%) stopped treatment because of toxicity (10 in combined drug strategy; six in tumour necrosis inhibitor factor strategy); five stopped (2%) because of disease progression (one and four, respectively); and 37 (18%) stopped for other reasons including patients’ decisions to stop treatment (21 and 16, respectively).


Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

Scott DL, Ibrahim F, Farewell V, O'Keeffe AG, Walker D, Kelly C, Birrell F, Chakravarty K, Maddison P, Heslin M, Patel A, Kingsley GH - BMJ (2015)

Fig 1 Consort flowchart of study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358851&req=5

fig1: Fig 1 Consort flowchart of study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomised to treatment with combinations of disease modifying drugs or tumour necrosis factor inhibitors
Mentions: Between September 2008 and December 2010, we screened 432 patients, randomised 214, and treated 205 (fig 1). Of these 205 treated patients, 147 (72%) completed 12 months of treatment; 16 (8%) were lost to follow-up; 42 (20%) discontinued the intervention and were followed-up; 16 (8%) stopped treatment because of toxicity (10 in combined drug strategy; six in tumour necrosis inhibitor factor strategy); five stopped (2%) because of disease progression (one and four, respectively); and 37 (18%) stopped for other reasons including patients’ decisions to stop treatment (21 and 16, respectively).

Bottom Line: Initial reductions in disease activity were greater with the biologic strategy, but these differences did not persist beyond six months.Remission was seen in 72 patients (44 with biologic strategy; 36 with alternative strategy); 28 patients had serious adverse events (18 and 10, respectively); six and 10 patients, respectively, stopped treatment because of toxicity.The alternative strategy reduced health and social care costs per patient by £3615 (€4930, $5585) for months 0-6 and £1930 for months 6-12.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, King's College London School of Medicine, London SE5 9RJ, UK d.scott1@nhs.net.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus