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How and why to study autophagy in Drosophila: it's more than just a garbage chute.

Nagy P, Varga Á, Kovács AL, Takáts S, Juhász G - Methods (2014)

Bottom Line: This way, autophagy contributes to the homeodynamic turnover of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, glycogen, and even whole organelles.Autophagic activity is increased by adverse conditions such as nutrient limitation, growth factor withdrawal and oxidative stress, and it generally protects cells and organisms to promote their survival.Here we discuss the different microscopy-based, biochemical and genetic methods currently available to study autophagy in various tissues of the popular model Drosophila.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány s. 1/C. 6.520, Budapest H-1117, Hungary.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The process and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. The sequential and coordinated action of Atg protein complexes mediates the formation of phagophores and double-membrane autophagosomes. Fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes (or with late endosomes) requires a Syntaxin 17-containing SNARE complex and the HOPS tethering complex. Autophagic cargo is degraded in autolysosomes, which is followed by recycling of degradation products in synthetic and energy producing pathways.
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f0005: The process and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. The sequential and coordinated action of Atg protein complexes mediates the formation of phagophores and double-membrane autophagosomes. Fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes (or with late endosomes) requires a Syntaxin 17-containing SNARE complex and the HOPS tethering complex. Autophagic cargo is degraded in autolysosomes, which is followed by recycling of degradation products in synthetic and energy producing pathways.

Mentions: Eukaryotic cells can deliver portions of their own cytoplasm (including organelles and protein aggregates) for lysosomal degradation in several ways [1]. Macroautophagy (hereafter simply referred to as autophagy) is the best studied and probably most abundant of these routes. Three main steps can be distinguished during this vesicular transport process (Fig. 1). First, a phagophore cistern (also known as the isolation membrane) forms and engulfs cytoplasmic cargo into a double-membrane vesicle called autophagosome. Second, the autophagosome fuses with a lysosome (or late endosome) to give rise to an autolysosome (or amphisome). Third, contents delivered for degradation are broken down by acidic hydrolases within the autolysosome, and the resulting monomers are recycled for biosynthesis and energy production.


How and why to study autophagy in Drosophila: it's more than just a garbage chute.

Nagy P, Varga Á, Kovács AL, Takáts S, Juhász G - Methods (2014)

The process and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. The sequential and coordinated action of Atg protein complexes mediates the formation of phagophores and double-membrane autophagosomes. Fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes (or with late endosomes) requires a Syntaxin 17-containing SNARE complex and the HOPS tethering complex. Autophagic cargo is degraded in autolysosomes, which is followed by recycling of degradation products in synthetic and energy producing pathways.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358840&req=5

f0005: The process and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. The sequential and coordinated action of Atg protein complexes mediates the formation of phagophores and double-membrane autophagosomes. Fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes (or with late endosomes) requires a Syntaxin 17-containing SNARE complex and the HOPS tethering complex. Autophagic cargo is degraded in autolysosomes, which is followed by recycling of degradation products in synthetic and energy producing pathways.
Mentions: Eukaryotic cells can deliver portions of their own cytoplasm (including organelles and protein aggregates) for lysosomal degradation in several ways [1]. Macroautophagy (hereafter simply referred to as autophagy) is the best studied and probably most abundant of these routes. Three main steps can be distinguished during this vesicular transport process (Fig. 1). First, a phagophore cistern (also known as the isolation membrane) forms and engulfs cytoplasmic cargo into a double-membrane vesicle called autophagosome. Second, the autophagosome fuses with a lysosome (or late endosome) to give rise to an autolysosome (or amphisome). Third, contents delivered for degradation are broken down by acidic hydrolases within the autolysosome, and the resulting monomers are recycled for biosynthesis and energy production.

Bottom Line: This way, autophagy contributes to the homeodynamic turnover of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, glycogen, and even whole organelles.Autophagic activity is increased by adverse conditions such as nutrient limitation, growth factor withdrawal and oxidative stress, and it generally protects cells and organisms to promote their survival.Here we discuss the different microscopy-based, biochemical and genetic methods currently available to study autophagy in various tissues of the popular model Drosophila.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány s. 1/C. 6.520, Budapest H-1117, Hungary.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus