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Residential exposure to traffic noise and health-related quality of life--a population-based study.

Roswall N, Høgh V, Envold-Bidstrup P, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Ketzel M, Overvad K, Olsen A, Sørensen M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic factors showed that a 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36 assessment was associated with a 0.14 lower mental component summary (MCS) score (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26, -0.01).The physical component summary was not associated with traffic noise.The magnitude of effect was, however, not clinically relevant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have investigated the association between objectively measured traffic noise and health-related quality of life. However, as traffic noise has been associated with both cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and health-issues including sleeping problems, annoyance, and stress, it seems plausible that traffic noise is associated with health-related quality of life.

Methods: Between 1999 and 2002, a cohort of 38,964 Danes filled in the short form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Residential exposure to road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all historical addresses for 10 years preceding the SF-36, using the Nordic prediction method. Associations between noise exposure and SF-36 summary scales and the eight sub-scales were calculated using general linear models, adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and lifestyle.

Results: Models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic factors showed that a 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36 assessment was associated with a 0.14 lower mental component summary (MCS) score (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26, -0.01). However, further adjustment for lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol, and waist circumference) attenuated the association: (-0.08 (95% CI: -0.20, 0.04)). Exposure to more than 55 dB of railway noise in the same time period was borderline significantly associated with lower MCS. The physical component summary was not associated with traffic noise.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a weak association between traffic noise exposure and the mental health component score of SF-36, which may operate through lifestyle. The magnitude of effect was, however, not clinically relevant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise 1 year before SF-36 and MCS score.Left: Model 2, right: Model 3. Development in MCS-score over the spectrum of road traffic noise exposure from 48 to 71 dB. X-aksis: Road traffic noise in dB, y-aksis: MCS-score. Solid line: Estimate. Grey lines: 95% CI.
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pone.0120199.g001: Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise 1 year before SF-36 and MCS score.Left: Model 2, right: Model 3. Development in MCS-score over the spectrum of road traffic noise exposure from 48 to 71 dB. X-aksis: Road traffic noise in dB, y-aksis: MCS-score. Solid line: Estimate. Grey lines: 95% CI.

Mentions: The Pearson correlation coefficient between road traffic noise 1 and 10 years preceding HRQoL was 0.91. The crude analyses (Model 1) showed statistically significant associations between road traffic noise and both PCS and MCS, suggesting that traffic noise had a negative effect on HRQoL (all p < 0.0001). The models adjusted for socioeconomic factors (Model 2) showed an association between road traffic noise and MCS with a 0.14 lower MCS score (95% CI: -0.26, -0.01) per 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36. The exposure-response curve found no specific window of effect, and showed that the magnitude of effect of traffic noise on HRQoL was not of clinical relevance—especially not after adjustment for individual lifestyle factors (Table 2, Fig. 1). PCS was not significantly associated with SF-36 in the adjusted models (Table 2).


Residential exposure to traffic noise and health-related quality of life--a population-based study.

Roswall N, Høgh V, Envold-Bidstrup P, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Ketzel M, Overvad K, Olsen A, Sørensen M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise 1 year before SF-36 and MCS score.Left: Model 2, right: Model 3. Development in MCS-score over the spectrum of road traffic noise exposure from 48 to 71 dB. X-aksis: Road traffic noise in dB, y-aksis: MCS-score. Solid line: Estimate. Grey lines: 95% CI.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358829&req=5

pone.0120199.g001: Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise 1 year before SF-36 and MCS score.Left: Model 2, right: Model 3. Development in MCS-score over the spectrum of road traffic noise exposure from 48 to 71 dB. X-aksis: Road traffic noise in dB, y-aksis: MCS-score. Solid line: Estimate. Grey lines: 95% CI.
Mentions: The Pearson correlation coefficient between road traffic noise 1 and 10 years preceding HRQoL was 0.91. The crude analyses (Model 1) showed statistically significant associations between road traffic noise and both PCS and MCS, suggesting that traffic noise had a negative effect on HRQoL (all p < 0.0001). The models adjusted for socioeconomic factors (Model 2) showed an association between road traffic noise and MCS with a 0.14 lower MCS score (95% CI: -0.26, -0.01) per 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36. The exposure-response curve found no specific window of effect, and showed that the magnitude of effect of traffic noise on HRQoL was not of clinical relevance—especially not after adjustment for individual lifestyle factors (Table 2, Fig. 1). PCS was not significantly associated with SF-36 in the adjusted models (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic factors showed that a 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36 assessment was associated with a 0.14 lower mental component summary (MCS) score (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26, -0.01).The physical component summary was not associated with traffic noise.The magnitude of effect was, however, not clinically relevant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have investigated the association between objectively measured traffic noise and health-related quality of life. However, as traffic noise has been associated with both cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and health-issues including sleeping problems, annoyance, and stress, it seems plausible that traffic noise is associated with health-related quality of life.

Methods: Between 1999 and 2002, a cohort of 38,964 Danes filled in the short form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Residential exposure to road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all historical addresses for 10 years preceding the SF-36, using the Nordic prediction method. Associations between noise exposure and SF-36 summary scales and the eight sub-scales were calculated using general linear models, adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and lifestyle.

Results: Models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic factors showed that a 10 dB higher road traffic noise 1 year preceding SF-36 assessment was associated with a 0.14 lower mental component summary (MCS) score (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26, -0.01). However, further adjustment for lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol, and waist circumference) attenuated the association: (-0.08 (95% CI: -0.20, 0.04)). Exposure to more than 55 dB of railway noise in the same time period was borderline significantly associated with lower MCS. The physical component summary was not associated with traffic noise.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a weak association between traffic noise exposure and the mental health component score of SF-36, which may operate through lifestyle. The magnitude of effect was, however, not clinically relevant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus