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Socioeconomic status and environmental noise exposure in Montreal, Canada.

Dale LM, Goudreau S, Perron S, Ragettli MS, Hatzopoulou M, Smargiassi A - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: This study's objective was to determine whether socioeconomically deprived populations are exposed to greater levels of environmental noise.Indicators of socioeconomic status were correlated with LAeq24h noise levels estimated with a land-use regression model at a small geographic scale.We found that noise exposure was associated with all socioeconomic indicators, with the strongest correlations found for median household income, proportion of people who spend over 30% of their income on housing, proportion of people below the low income boundary and with a social deprivation index combining several socio-economic variables.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. laura.dale@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study's objective was to determine whether socioeconomically deprived populations are exposed to greater levels of environmental noise.

Methods: Indicators of socioeconomic status were correlated with LAeq24h noise levels estimated with a land-use regression model at a small geographic scale.

Results: We found that noise exposure was associated with all socioeconomic indicators, with the strongest correlations found for median household income, proportion of people who spend over 30% of their income on housing, proportion of people below the low income boundary and with a social deprivation index combining several socio-economic variables.

Conclusion: Our results were inconsistent with a number of studies performed elsewhere, indicating that locally conducted studies are imperative to assessing whether this double burden of noise exposure and low socioeconomic status exists in other contexts. The primary implication of our study is that noise exposure represents an environmental injustice in Montreal, which is an issue that merits both investigation and concern.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

LAeq24h noise levels by dissemination areas in Montreal.
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Fig2: LAeq24h noise levels by dissemination areas in Montreal.

Mentions: LAeq24h noise levels for the sampling period were in the range of 50.5-68.8 dBA with an arithmetic mean of 58.3 ± 3.2 dBA and median level of 58.3 dBA. The Island of Montreal is noisier mainly where highways and industrial areas are present in the north-east of the island, and in the west where highways and the international Montreal Airport are also found (Figure 2).Figure 2


Socioeconomic status and environmental noise exposure in Montreal, Canada.

Dale LM, Goudreau S, Perron S, Ragettli MS, Hatzopoulou M, Smargiassi A - BMC Public Health (2015)

LAeq24h noise levels by dissemination areas in Montreal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4358710&req=5

Fig2: LAeq24h noise levels by dissemination areas in Montreal.
Mentions: LAeq24h noise levels for the sampling period were in the range of 50.5-68.8 dBA with an arithmetic mean of 58.3 ± 3.2 dBA and median level of 58.3 dBA. The Island of Montreal is noisier mainly where highways and industrial areas are present in the north-east of the island, and in the west where highways and the international Montreal Airport are also found (Figure 2).Figure 2

Bottom Line: This study's objective was to determine whether socioeconomically deprived populations are exposed to greater levels of environmental noise.Indicators of socioeconomic status were correlated with LAeq24h noise levels estimated with a land-use regression model at a small geographic scale.We found that noise exposure was associated with all socioeconomic indicators, with the strongest correlations found for median household income, proportion of people who spend over 30% of their income on housing, proportion of people below the low income boundary and with a social deprivation index combining several socio-economic variables.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. laura.dale@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study's objective was to determine whether socioeconomically deprived populations are exposed to greater levels of environmental noise.

Methods: Indicators of socioeconomic status were correlated with LAeq24h noise levels estimated with a land-use regression model at a small geographic scale.

Results: We found that noise exposure was associated with all socioeconomic indicators, with the strongest correlations found for median household income, proportion of people who spend over 30% of their income on housing, proportion of people below the low income boundary and with a social deprivation index combining several socio-economic variables.

Conclusion: Our results were inconsistent with a number of studies performed elsewhere, indicating that locally conducted studies are imperative to assessing whether this double burden of noise exposure and low socioeconomic status exists in other contexts. The primary implication of our study is that noise exposure represents an environmental injustice in Montreal, which is an issue that merits both investigation and concern.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus