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Ventral dermatitis in rowi (Apteryx rowi) due to cutaneous larval migrans.

Gartrell BD, Argilla L, Finlayson S, Gedye K, Gonzalez Argandona AK, Graham I, Howe L, Hunter S, Lenting B, Makan T, McInnes K, Michael S, Morgan KJ, Scott I, Sijbranda D, van Zyl N, Ward JM - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2014)

Bottom Line: Severe and fatal complications of the investigation resulted in the death of eight birds of aspergillosis and pulmonary complications associated with the use of bark as a substrate in hospital.These complications have the potential to undermine the working relationship between wildlife veterinarians and conservation managers.This case highlights that intensive conservation management can result in increased opportunities for novel routes of cross-species pathogen transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildbase, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North 4410, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
The rowi is a critically endangered species of kiwi. Young birds on a crèche island showed loss of feathers from the ventral abdomen and a scurfy dermatitis of the abdominal skin and vent margin. Histology of skin biopsies identified cutaneous larval migrans, which was shown by molecular sequencing to be possibly from a species of Trichostrongylus as a cause of ventral dermatitis and occasional ulcerative vent dermatitis. The predisposing factors that led to this disease are suspected to be the novel exposure of the rowi to parasites from seabirds or marine mammals due to the island crèche and the limited management of roost boxes. This is the first instance of cutaneous larval migrans to be recorded in birds. Severe and fatal complications of the investigation resulted in the death of eight birds of aspergillosis and pulmonary complications associated with the use of bark as a substrate in hospital. Another bird died of renal failure during the period of hospitalisation despite oral and intravenous fluid therapy. The initiating cause of the renal failure was not determined. These complications have the potential to undermine the working relationship between wildlife veterinarians and conservation managers. This case highlights that intensive conservation management can result in increased opportunities for novel routes of cross-species pathogen transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The gross appearance at the ventral abdomen and vent of two rowi on initial capture on the crèche island. In bird A, there is exudative dermatitis matting the feathers to the vent and uropygial gland. In bird B, there is alopecia and broken feathers of the skin around the vent and hyperkeratosis of the surrounding skin.
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f0015: The gross appearance at the ventral abdomen and vent of two rowi on initial capture on the crèche island. In bird A, there is exudative dermatitis matting the feathers to the vent and uropygial gland. In bird B, there is alopecia and broken feathers of the skin around the vent and hyperkeratosis of the surrounding skin.

Mentions: Physical examination of the birds on admission showed a range of clinical abnormalities in the ventral abdominal and peri-cloacal skin (Fig. 1). All birds (15/15) showed alopecia and broken feather stubs in this area. Seven of fifteen birds showed evidence of mild dermatitis as characterised by hyperkeratotic scurfy skin. In three more severe cases there were small ulcers and fissures on the vent margin with varying degrees of exudation and matting of feathers to the vent.


Ventral dermatitis in rowi (Apteryx rowi) due to cutaneous larval migrans.

Gartrell BD, Argilla L, Finlayson S, Gedye K, Gonzalez Argandona AK, Graham I, Howe L, Hunter S, Lenting B, Makan T, McInnes K, Michael S, Morgan KJ, Scott I, Sijbranda D, van Zyl N, Ward JM - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2014)

The gross appearance at the ventral abdomen and vent of two rowi on initial capture on the crèche island. In bird A, there is exudative dermatitis matting the feathers to the vent and uropygial gland. In bird B, there is alopecia and broken feathers of the skin around the vent and hyperkeratosis of the surrounding skin.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356737&req=5

f0015: The gross appearance at the ventral abdomen and vent of two rowi on initial capture on the crèche island. In bird A, there is exudative dermatitis matting the feathers to the vent and uropygial gland. In bird B, there is alopecia and broken feathers of the skin around the vent and hyperkeratosis of the surrounding skin.
Mentions: Physical examination of the birds on admission showed a range of clinical abnormalities in the ventral abdominal and peri-cloacal skin (Fig. 1). All birds (15/15) showed alopecia and broken feather stubs in this area. Seven of fifteen birds showed evidence of mild dermatitis as characterised by hyperkeratotic scurfy skin. In three more severe cases there were small ulcers and fissures on the vent margin with varying degrees of exudation and matting of feathers to the vent.

Bottom Line: Severe and fatal complications of the investigation resulted in the death of eight birds of aspergillosis and pulmonary complications associated with the use of bark as a substrate in hospital.These complications have the potential to undermine the working relationship between wildlife veterinarians and conservation managers.This case highlights that intensive conservation management can result in increased opportunities for novel routes of cross-species pathogen transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildbase, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North 4410, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
The rowi is a critically endangered species of kiwi. Young birds on a crèche island showed loss of feathers from the ventral abdomen and a scurfy dermatitis of the abdominal skin and vent margin. Histology of skin biopsies identified cutaneous larval migrans, which was shown by molecular sequencing to be possibly from a species of Trichostrongylus as a cause of ventral dermatitis and occasional ulcerative vent dermatitis. The predisposing factors that led to this disease are suspected to be the novel exposure of the rowi to parasites from seabirds or marine mammals due to the island crèche and the limited management of roost boxes. This is the first instance of cutaneous larval migrans to be recorded in birds. Severe and fatal complications of the investigation resulted in the death of eight birds of aspergillosis and pulmonary complications associated with the use of bark as a substrate in hospital. Another bird died of renal failure during the period of hospitalisation despite oral and intravenous fluid therapy. The initiating cause of the renal failure was not determined. These complications have the potential to undermine the working relationship between wildlife veterinarians and conservation managers. This case highlights that intensive conservation management can result in increased opportunities for novel routes of cross-species pathogen transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus