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A survey of UK healthcare workers' attitudes on volunteering to help with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Turtle L, McGill F, Bettridge J, Matata C, Christley R, Solomon T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, for those who were not considering going, or who had decided against going, family considerations and partner concerns were the most important factors.More UK healthcare workers would volunteer to help tackle Ebola in West Africa if there was better information available, including clarity about roles, cover arrangements, and training.This could be achieved with a well-publicised high quality portal of reliable information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Ronald Ross Building, Liverpool, L69 7BE, United Kingdom; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Ronald Ross Building, Liverpool, L69 7BE, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To understand the barriers and enablers for UK healthcare workers who are considering going to work in the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but have not yet volunteered.

Design: After focus group discussions, and a pilot questionnaire, an anonymous survey was conducted using SurveyMonkey to determine whether people had considered going to West Africa, what factors might make them more or less likely to volunteer, and whether any of these were modifiable factors.

Participants: The survey was publicised among doctors, nurses, laboratory staff and allied health professionals. 3109 people answered the survey, of whom 472 (15%) were considering going to work in the epidemic but had not yet volunteered. 1791 (57.6%) had not considered going, 704 (22.6%) had considered going but decided not to, 53 (1.7%) had volunteered to go and 14 (0.45%) had already been and worked in the epidemic.

Results: For those considering going to West Africa, the most important factor preventing them from volunteering was a lack of information to help them decide; fear of getting Ebola and partners' concerns came next. Uncertainty about their potential role, current work commitments and inability to get agreement from their employer were also important barriers, whereas clarity over training would be an important enabler. In contrast, for those who were not considering going, or who had decided against going, family considerations and partner concerns were the most important factors.

Conclusions: More UK healthcare workers would volunteer to help tackle Ebola in West Africa if there was better information available, including clarity about roles, cover arrangements, and training. This could be achieved with a well-publicised high quality portal of reliable information.

Show MeSH
Barriers and enablers to going to West Africa to help with the Ebola outbreak for four groups of respondents.The importance of each issue is indicated on a 5 point Likert scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree, for those who were considering going but had not yet decided (“Considering”); those who had not considered going (“Not Considered”); those who had considered it and decided not to go (“Decided Against”); those who had volunteered and were waiting to go (“Volunteered”), and those who had already been (“Already Been”). Issues marked * were introduced in the second version of the questionnaire from 22nd October onwards (1450 responses). Data are the percentage of respondents giving the answers indicated; and the rank is indicated showing how important that issue was for that group. The values from which the figure is derived are given in S1 and S2 Tables.
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pone.0120013.g001: Barriers and enablers to going to West Africa to help with the Ebola outbreak for four groups of respondents.The importance of each issue is indicated on a 5 point Likert scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree, for those who were considering going but had not yet decided (“Considering”); those who had not considered going (“Not Considered”); those who had considered it and decided not to go (“Decided Against”); those who had volunteered and were waiting to go (“Volunteered”), and those who had already been (“Already Been”). Issues marked * were introduced in the second version of the questionnaire from 22nd October onwards (1450 responses). Data are the percentage of respondents giving the answers indicated; and the rank is indicated showing how important that issue was for that group. The values from which the figure is derived are given in S1 and S2 Tables.

Mentions: Our analysis focussed on the 472 people in the Considering group, because this is the group who may be willing to go to West Africa. For people in this group, the most important barrier identified for not yet having volunteered was insufficient information to reach a decision (Fig. 1). Some of the areas of what information is required can be summed up in this quote:


A survey of UK healthcare workers' attitudes on volunteering to help with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Turtle L, McGill F, Bettridge J, Matata C, Christley R, Solomon T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Barriers and enablers to going to West Africa to help with the Ebola outbreak for four groups of respondents.The importance of each issue is indicated on a 5 point Likert scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree, for those who were considering going but had not yet decided (“Considering”); those who had not considered going (“Not Considered”); those who had considered it and decided not to go (“Decided Against”); those who had volunteered and were waiting to go (“Volunteered”), and those who had already been (“Already Been”). Issues marked * were introduced in the second version of the questionnaire from 22nd October onwards (1450 responses). Data are the percentage of respondents giving the answers indicated; and the rank is indicated showing how important that issue was for that group. The values from which the figure is derived are given in S1 and S2 Tables.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356617&req=5

pone.0120013.g001: Barriers and enablers to going to West Africa to help with the Ebola outbreak for four groups of respondents.The importance of each issue is indicated on a 5 point Likert scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree, for those who were considering going but had not yet decided (“Considering”); those who had not considered going (“Not Considered”); those who had considered it and decided not to go (“Decided Against”); those who had volunteered and were waiting to go (“Volunteered”), and those who had already been (“Already Been”). Issues marked * were introduced in the second version of the questionnaire from 22nd October onwards (1450 responses). Data are the percentage of respondents giving the answers indicated; and the rank is indicated showing how important that issue was for that group. The values from which the figure is derived are given in S1 and S2 Tables.
Mentions: Our analysis focussed on the 472 people in the Considering group, because this is the group who may be willing to go to West Africa. For people in this group, the most important barrier identified for not yet having volunteered was insufficient information to reach a decision (Fig. 1). Some of the areas of what information is required can be summed up in this quote:

Bottom Line: In contrast, for those who were not considering going, or who had decided against going, family considerations and partner concerns were the most important factors.More UK healthcare workers would volunteer to help tackle Ebola in West Africa if there was better information available, including clarity about roles, cover arrangements, and training.This could be achieved with a well-publicised high quality portal of reliable information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Ronald Ross Building, Liverpool, L69 7BE, United Kingdom; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Ronald Ross Building, Liverpool, L69 7BE, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To understand the barriers and enablers for UK healthcare workers who are considering going to work in the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but have not yet volunteered.

Design: After focus group discussions, and a pilot questionnaire, an anonymous survey was conducted using SurveyMonkey to determine whether people had considered going to West Africa, what factors might make them more or less likely to volunteer, and whether any of these were modifiable factors.

Participants: The survey was publicised among doctors, nurses, laboratory staff and allied health professionals. 3109 people answered the survey, of whom 472 (15%) were considering going to work in the epidemic but had not yet volunteered. 1791 (57.6%) had not considered going, 704 (22.6%) had considered going but decided not to, 53 (1.7%) had volunteered to go and 14 (0.45%) had already been and worked in the epidemic.

Results: For those considering going to West Africa, the most important factor preventing them from volunteering was a lack of information to help them decide; fear of getting Ebola and partners' concerns came next. Uncertainty about their potential role, current work commitments and inability to get agreement from their employer were also important barriers, whereas clarity over training would be an important enabler. In contrast, for those who were not considering going, or who had decided against going, family considerations and partner concerns were the most important factors.

Conclusions: More UK healthcare workers would volunteer to help tackle Ebola in West Africa if there was better information available, including clarity about roles, cover arrangements, and training. This could be achieved with a well-publicised high quality portal of reliable information.

Show MeSH