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Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

Liu Z, Zhang Y, Franzin L, Cormier JN, Chan W, Xu H, Du XL - Int. J. Oncol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011.For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas.Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA.

ABSTRACT
Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Breast cancer age-adjusted incidence rates over time by tumor stage, 1995–2011. (A) Texas. (B) SEER.
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f3-ijo-46-04-1819: Breast cancer age-adjusted incidence rates over time by tumor stage, 1995–2011. (A) Texas. (B) SEER.

Mentions: Figs. 3 and 4 present the age-adjusted tumor stage-specific incidence rates for breast and colorectal cancer in the TCR and SEER. For breast cancer, tumor stage-specific incidence rates were similar between the TCR (Fig. 3A) and SEER (Fig. 3B), in which incidence for localized breast cancer increased early on and then decreased, while the incidence for distant stage breast cancer was stable with a slight increase over time. For colorectal cancer, the incidence for all stages decreased over time in the TCR (Fig. 4A) and in SEER (Fig. 4B) except for an increase for unknown stage colorectal cancer in the TCR from 2008 to 2011.


Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

Liu Z, Zhang Y, Franzin L, Cormier JN, Chan W, Xu H, Du XL - Int. J. Oncol. (2015)

Breast cancer age-adjusted incidence rates over time by tumor stage, 1995–2011. (A) Texas. (B) SEER.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356494&req=5

f3-ijo-46-04-1819: Breast cancer age-adjusted incidence rates over time by tumor stage, 1995–2011. (A) Texas. (B) SEER.
Mentions: Figs. 3 and 4 present the age-adjusted tumor stage-specific incidence rates for breast and colorectal cancer in the TCR and SEER. For breast cancer, tumor stage-specific incidence rates were similar between the TCR (Fig. 3A) and SEER (Fig. 3B), in which incidence for localized breast cancer increased early on and then decreased, while the incidence for distant stage breast cancer was stable with a slight increase over time. For colorectal cancer, the incidence for all stages decreased over time in the TCR (Fig. 4A) and in SEER (Fig. 4B) except for an increase for unknown stage colorectal cancer in the TCR from 2008 to 2011.

Bottom Line: Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011.For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas.Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA.

ABSTRACT
Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus