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Stunning popularity of LARCs with good access and quality: a major opportunity to meet family planning needs.

- Glob Health Sci Pract (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Given true choice, a very high proportion of women, perhaps most, would select one of the long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—implants or IUDs—for contraception. If implemented on a wide scale, it would not only drastically alter the current method mix but also serve client needs much better and prevent unintended pregnancy more successfully.

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Method Mix Among New Modern Method Users at CARE-Supported Facilities in 5 Crisis-Affected Countries,a July 2011–December 2013a Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan.b Other modern methods included injectables, oral contraceptive pills, tubal ligation, and vasectomy.
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f01: Method Mix Among New Modern Method Users at CARE-Supported Facilities in 5 Crisis-Affected Countries,a July 2011–December 2013a Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan.b Other modern methods included injectables, oral contraceptive pills, tubal ligation, and vasectomy.

Mentions: Now also witness the striking findings from a very different setting—CARE's very large family planning intervention in 5 crisis-affected countries, reported in this issue of GHSP.2,3 In this well-executed substantial program, in which more than 52,000 women who were given a wide choice of methods started using a modern method, overall a remarkably high 61% of them selected LARCs (Figure). To appreciate fully this high proportion, we can compare it to the extensive global data on method mix compiled by Ross et al., also in this issue of GHSP.4 Overwhelmingly in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, short-acting methods by far predominate.


Stunning popularity of LARCs with good access and quality: a major opportunity to meet family planning needs.

- Glob Health Sci Pract (2015)

Method Mix Among New Modern Method Users at CARE-Supported Facilities in 5 Crisis-Affected Countries,a July 2011–December 2013a Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan.b Other modern methods included injectables, oral contraceptive pills, tubal ligation, and vasectomy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356271&req=5

f01: Method Mix Among New Modern Method Users at CARE-Supported Facilities in 5 Crisis-Affected Countries,a July 2011–December 2013a Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan.b Other modern methods included injectables, oral contraceptive pills, tubal ligation, and vasectomy.
Mentions: Now also witness the striking findings from a very different setting—CARE's very large family planning intervention in 5 crisis-affected countries, reported in this issue of GHSP.2,3 In this well-executed substantial program, in which more than 52,000 women who were given a wide choice of methods started using a modern method, overall a remarkably high 61% of them selected LARCs (Figure). To appreciate fully this high proportion, we can compare it to the extensive global data on method mix compiled by Ross et al., also in this issue of GHSP.4 Overwhelmingly in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, short-acting methods by far predominate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Given true choice, a very high proportion of women, perhaps most, would select one of the long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—implants or IUDs—for contraception. If implemented on a wide scale, it would not only drastically alter the current method mix but also serve client needs much better and prevent unintended pregnancy more successfully.

Show MeSH