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Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

Bravo IG, Félez-Sánchez M - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals.Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota.Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain igbravo@iconcologia.net.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the GenBank. Data have been extracted at the level of type for the genera encompassing PVs infecting humans: Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Mu- and NuPVs. The evolution of the number of different full-length genome HPV16 variants is also shown. The trends in the number of sequences available indicate that although the members of AlphaPVs, the best-studied PVs, have reached a plateau, the number of Beta- and GammaPVs is still increasing. Only three members within Mu- and NuPVs have been described. Although largely undersampled and constantly growing, the number of animal PVs represents one-third of the global known PV diversity
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eov003-F4: Evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the GenBank. Data have been extracted at the level of type for the genera encompassing PVs infecting humans: Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Mu- and NuPVs. The evolution of the number of different full-length genome HPV16 variants is also shown. The trends in the number of sequences available indicate that although the members of AlphaPVs, the best-studied PVs, have reached a plateau, the number of Beta- and GammaPVs is still increasing. Only three members within Mu- and NuPVs have been described. Although largely undersampled and constantly growing, the number of animal PVs represents one-third of the global known PV diversity

Mentions: Around two-thirds of the full-length genome PV types entries in the Genbank correspond to HPVs. The strong research focus on PVs and cancer has led to the description of around 60 types in the AlphaPVs genus, which harbours all oncogenic HPVs associated to anogenital cancers. The advent of rolling circle amplification first and of next-generation sequencing later have largely expanded the number of HPVs classified as Beta- or GammaPVs, with both genera spanning now over hundred HPV types. Results from metagenomic surveys suggest that we may have already identified most human AlphaPVs [51], whereas most of the unexplored HPV diversity may belong within the Beta- and GammaPVs [52, 53]. This trend is also reflected in the evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the Genbank, with AlphaPVs reaching a plateau, whereas BetaPVs steadily increase and the number of GammaPVs has rocketed (Fig. 4). It is very interesting to note that two PV genera (Mu- and NuPVs) encompass only three HPVs for which no close relative has been described thus far. Should this difference in number be true, it would imply a large variation in differential success, as measured in terms of number of lineages infecting the same host, for different PV genera, in the sequence GammaPVs > BetaPVs ≥ AlphaPVs >> MuPVs ≥ NuPVs.Figure 4.


Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

Bravo IG, Félez-Sánchez M - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the GenBank. Data have been extracted at the level of type for the genera encompassing PVs infecting humans: Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Mu- and NuPVs. The evolution of the number of different full-length genome HPV16 variants is also shown. The trends in the number of sequences available indicate that although the members of AlphaPVs, the best-studied PVs, have reached a plateau, the number of Beta- and GammaPVs is still increasing. Only three members within Mu- and NuPVs have been described. Although largely undersampled and constantly growing, the number of animal PVs represents one-third of the global known PV diversity
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356112&req=5

eov003-F4: Evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the GenBank. Data have been extracted at the level of type for the genera encompassing PVs infecting humans: Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Mu- and NuPVs. The evolution of the number of different full-length genome HPV16 variants is also shown. The trends in the number of sequences available indicate that although the members of AlphaPVs, the best-studied PVs, have reached a plateau, the number of Beta- and GammaPVs is still increasing. Only three members within Mu- and NuPVs have been described. Although largely undersampled and constantly growing, the number of animal PVs represents one-third of the global known PV diversity
Mentions: Around two-thirds of the full-length genome PV types entries in the Genbank correspond to HPVs. The strong research focus on PVs and cancer has led to the description of around 60 types in the AlphaPVs genus, which harbours all oncogenic HPVs associated to anogenital cancers. The advent of rolling circle amplification first and of next-generation sequencing later have largely expanded the number of HPVs classified as Beta- or GammaPVs, with both genera spanning now over hundred HPV types. Results from metagenomic surveys suggest that we may have already identified most human AlphaPVs [51], whereas most of the unexplored HPV diversity may belong within the Beta- and GammaPVs [52, 53]. This trend is also reflected in the evolution of the number of PV sequences available in the Genbank, with AlphaPVs reaching a plateau, whereas BetaPVs steadily increase and the number of GammaPVs has rocketed (Fig. 4). It is very interesting to note that two PV genera (Mu- and NuPVs) encompass only three HPVs for which no close relative has been described thus far. Should this difference in number be true, it would imply a large variation in differential success, as measured in terms of number of lineages infecting the same host, for different PV genera, in the sequence GammaPVs > BetaPVs ≥ AlphaPVs >> MuPVs ≥ NuPVs.Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals.Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota.Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain Infections and Cancer Laboratory, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain; Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain igbravo@iconcologia.net.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus