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Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats.

Krivova NA, Zaeva OB, Grigorieva VA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups.Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts.The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Experimental Physiology, Institute of Biology and Biophysics, Tomsk State University Tomsk, Russia.

ABSTRACT
The Morris water maze (MWM) is a tool for assessment of age-related modulations spatial learning and memory in laboratory rats. In our work was investigated the age-related decline of MWM performance in 11-month-old rats and the effect exerted by training in the MWM on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old) and aged (11-month-old) male rats were trained in the MWM. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method. A reduced performance in the MWM test was found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that the aged 11-month-old rats can successfully learn in MWM. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The light sums of chemiluminescence for antioxidants (A Sm CL AC) and oxidants (B Sm CL ROS) in the brain part of 3-month-old rats after training in Morris water maze (“not trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10; “trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10). Brain parts: olfactory bulb, cerebellum, pons + medulla oblongata, frontal lobe cortex, mesencephalon, thalamencephalon. Along the Y axis, units = RLU·109 (RLU is the relative light units). Data are presented as the mean value ± SD. *p < 0.05 (the differences between groups of “not trained 3-month-old rats” and “trained 3-month-old rats”).
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Figure 2: The light sums of chemiluminescence for antioxidants (A Sm CL AC) and oxidants (B Sm CL ROS) in the brain part of 3-month-old rats after training in Morris water maze (“not trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10; “trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10). Brain parts: olfactory bulb, cerebellum, pons + medulla oblongata, frontal lobe cortex, mesencephalon, thalamencephalon. Along the Y axis, units = RLU·109 (RLU is the relative light units). Data are presented as the mean value ± SD. *p < 0.05 (the differences between groups of “not trained 3-month-old rats” and “trained 3-month-old rats”).

Mentions: In 3-month-old young adult rats, the Morris water-maze training exerted no effect on Sm CL AC but significantly decreased Sm CL ROS in all the tested brain parts in comparison with not trained young adult rats (Figure 2).


Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats.

Krivova NA, Zaeva OB, Grigorieva VA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

The light sums of chemiluminescence for antioxidants (A Sm CL AC) and oxidants (B Sm CL ROS) in the brain part of 3-month-old rats after training in Morris water maze (“not trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10; “trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10). Brain parts: olfactory bulb, cerebellum, pons + medulla oblongata, frontal lobe cortex, mesencephalon, thalamencephalon. Along the Y axis, units = RLU·109 (RLU is the relative light units). Data are presented as the mean value ± SD. *p < 0.05 (the differences between groups of “not trained 3-month-old rats” and “trained 3-month-old rats”).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356083&req=5

Figure 2: The light sums of chemiluminescence for antioxidants (A Sm CL AC) and oxidants (B Sm CL ROS) in the brain part of 3-month-old rats after training in Morris water maze (“not trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10; “trained 3-month-old rats,” n = 10). Brain parts: olfactory bulb, cerebellum, pons + medulla oblongata, frontal lobe cortex, mesencephalon, thalamencephalon. Along the Y axis, units = RLU·109 (RLU is the relative light units). Data are presented as the mean value ± SD. *p < 0.05 (the differences between groups of “not trained 3-month-old rats” and “trained 3-month-old rats”).
Mentions: In 3-month-old young adult rats, the Morris water-maze training exerted no effect on Sm CL AC but significantly decreased Sm CL ROS in all the tested brain parts in comparison with not trained young adult rats (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups.Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts.The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Experimental Physiology, Institute of Biology and Biophysics, Tomsk State University Tomsk, Russia.

ABSTRACT
The Morris water maze (MWM) is a tool for assessment of age-related modulations spatial learning and memory in laboratory rats. In our work was investigated the age-related decline of MWM performance in 11-month-old rats and the effect exerted by training in the MWM on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old) and aged (11-month-old) male rats were trained in the MWM. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method. A reduced performance in the MWM test was found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that the aged 11-month-old rats can successfully learn in MWM. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus