Limits...
Cognitive screening in brain tumors: short but sensitive enough?

Robinson GA, Biggs V, Walker DG - Front Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Performance is compared on broad measures of impairment: (a) number of patients impaired on the global screening measure or in any cognitive domain; and (b) number of cognitive domains impaired and specific analyses of MoCA-Intact and MoCA-Impaired patients on specific cognitive tests.Overall, based on our results from patients with brain tumor, the MoCA has extremely poor sensitivity for detecting cognitive impairments and a brief but tailored CA is necessary.These findings will be discussed in relation to broader issues for clinical management and planning, as well as specific considerations for neuropsychological assessment of brain tumor patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Research Unit, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, QLD , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Cognitive deficits in brain tumors are generally thought to be relatively mild and non-specific, although recent evidence challenges this notion. One possibility is that cognitive screening tools are being used to assess cognitive functions but their sensitivity to detect cognitive impairment may be limited. For improved sensitivity to recognize mild and/or focal cognitive deficits in brain tumors, neuropsychological evaluation tailored to detect specific impairments has been thought crucial. This study investigates the sensitivity of a cognitive screening tool, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), compared to a brief but tailored cognitive assessment (CA) for identifying cognitive deficits in an unselected primary brain tumor sample (i.e., low/high-grade gliomas, meningiomas). Performance is compared on broad measures of impairment: (a) number of patients impaired on the global screening measure or in any cognitive domain; and (b) number of cognitive domains impaired and specific analyses of MoCA-Intact and MoCA-Impaired patients on specific cognitive tests. The MoCA-Impaired group obtained lower naming and word fluency scores than the MoCA-Intact group, but otherwise performed comparably on cognitive tests. Overall, based on our results from patients with brain tumor, the MoCA has extremely poor sensitivity for detecting cognitive impairments and a brief but tailored CA is necessary. These findings will be discussed in relation to broader issues for clinical management and planning, as well as specific considerations for neuropsychological assessment of brain tumor patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cognitive assessment: MoCA-Intact participants impaired in domain-specific cognitive tests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356080&req=5

Figure 1: Cognitive assessment: MoCA-Intact participants impaired in domain-specific cognitive tests.

Mentions: For the specific measures based on Chan et al. (18), first we investigated the 16 MoCA-Intact patients for impairment in each cognitive domain assessed by the CA. Of these patients, 56.3% were impaired in at least one of the six cognitive domains. The percentage of MoCA-Intact patients impaired on domain-specific cognitive tests is shown in Figure 1. The main cognitive domains impaired for MoCA-Intact patients were abilities related to higher level executive functions, including abstract reasoning, followed by attention and memory. By contrast, language was only impaired in <10% and no patient was impaired on the test of visual perception.


Cognitive screening in brain tumors: short but sensitive enough?

Robinson GA, Biggs V, Walker DG - Front Oncol (2015)

Cognitive assessment: MoCA-Intact participants impaired in domain-specific cognitive tests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356080&req=5

Figure 1: Cognitive assessment: MoCA-Intact participants impaired in domain-specific cognitive tests.
Mentions: For the specific measures based on Chan et al. (18), first we investigated the 16 MoCA-Intact patients for impairment in each cognitive domain assessed by the CA. Of these patients, 56.3% were impaired in at least one of the six cognitive domains. The percentage of MoCA-Intact patients impaired on domain-specific cognitive tests is shown in Figure 1. The main cognitive domains impaired for MoCA-Intact patients were abilities related to higher level executive functions, including abstract reasoning, followed by attention and memory. By contrast, language was only impaired in <10% and no patient was impaired on the test of visual perception.

Bottom Line: Performance is compared on broad measures of impairment: (a) number of patients impaired on the global screening measure or in any cognitive domain; and (b) number of cognitive domains impaired and specific analyses of MoCA-Intact and MoCA-Impaired patients on specific cognitive tests.Overall, based on our results from patients with brain tumor, the MoCA has extremely poor sensitivity for detecting cognitive impairments and a brief but tailored CA is necessary.These findings will be discussed in relation to broader issues for clinical management and planning, as well as specific considerations for neuropsychological assessment of brain tumor patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Research Unit, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, QLD , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Cognitive deficits in brain tumors are generally thought to be relatively mild and non-specific, although recent evidence challenges this notion. One possibility is that cognitive screening tools are being used to assess cognitive functions but their sensitivity to detect cognitive impairment may be limited. For improved sensitivity to recognize mild and/or focal cognitive deficits in brain tumors, neuropsychological evaluation tailored to detect specific impairments has been thought crucial. This study investigates the sensitivity of a cognitive screening tool, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), compared to a brief but tailored cognitive assessment (CA) for identifying cognitive deficits in an unselected primary brain tumor sample (i.e., low/high-grade gliomas, meningiomas). Performance is compared on broad measures of impairment: (a) number of patients impaired on the global screening measure or in any cognitive domain; and (b) number of cognitive domains impaired and specific analyses of MoCA-Intact and MoCA-Impaired patients on specific cognitive tests. The MoCA-Impaired group obtained lower naming and word fluency scores than the MoCA-Intact group, but otherwise performed comparably on cognitive tests. Overall, based on our results from patients with brain tumor, the MoCA has extremely poor sensitivity for detecting cognitive impairments and a brief but tailored CA is necessary. These findings will be discussed in relation to broader issues for clinical management and planning, as well as specific considerations for neuropsychological assessment of brain tumor patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus