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Events and children's sense of time: a perspective on the origins of everyday time-keeping.

Forman H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: It is therefore conceivable that our primeval or natural mode of time-keeping involves the perception, estimation, and coordination of events.I find it likely that events continues to subserve our sense of time and time-keeping efforts, especially for children who have not yet mastered the use of clock-time.Instead of seeing events as a distraction to our perception of time, I suggest that our experience and understanding of time emerges from our perception of events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Umeå Umeå, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In this article I discuss abstract or pure time versus the content of time, (i.e., events, activities, and other goings-on). Or, more specifically, the utility of these two sorts of time in time-keeping or temporal organization. It is often assumed that abstract, uniform, and objective time is a universal physical entity out there, which humans may perceive of. However, this sort of evenly flowing time was only recently introduced to the human community, together with the mechanical clock. Before the introduction of mechanical clock-time, there were only events available to denote the extent of time. Events defined time, unlike the way time may define events in our present day culture. It is therefore conceivable that our primeval or natural mode of time-keeping involves the perception, estimation, and coordination of events. I find it likely that events continues to subserve our sense of time and time-keeping efforts, especially for children who have not yet mastered the use of clock-time. Instead of seeing events as a distraction to our perception of time, I suggest that our experience and understanding of time emerges from our perception of events.

No MeSH data available.


Mental event-model of temporal relations among four events.
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Figure 1: Mental event-model of temporal relations among four events.

Mentions: The aim of the research described above was not to uncover the processes underlying time-keeping, but I think these results indicate that event representations play an important role in everyday life and furthermore, that events are not merely random noise but are perceived in a consistent and lawful manner. This in turn suggests that event-time and time-keeping by way of events possibly still is part of our cognitive repertoire. In my view, our modern way of time-keeping most likely consists of event-time together with clock-time. Children may, however, rely more on event-time and it may therefore be advantageous to investigate the development of time-keeping ability or sense of time in the context of events.


Events and children's sense of time: a perspective on the origins of everyday time-keeping.

Forman H - Front Psychol (2015)

Mental event-model of temporal relations among four events.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4356002&req=5

Figure 1: Mental event-model of temporal relations among four events.
Mentions: The aim of the research described above was not to uncover the processes underlying time-keeping, but I think these results indicate that event representations play an important role in everyday life and furthermore, that events are not merely random noise but are perceived in a consistent and lawful manner. This in turn suggests that event-time and time-keeping by way of events possibly still is part of our cognitive repertoire. In my view, our modern way of time-keeping most likely consists of event-time together with clock-time. Children may, however, rely more on event-time and it may therefore be advantageous to investigate the development of time-keeping ability or sense of time in the context of events.

Bottom Line: It is therefore conceivable that our primeval or natural mode of time-keeping involves the perception, estimation, and coordination of events.I find it likely that events continues to subserve our sense of time and time-keeping efforts, especially for children who have not yet mastered the use of clock-time.Instead of seeing events as a distraction to our perception of time, I suggest that our experience and understanding of time emerges from our perception of events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Umeå Umeå, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In this article I discuss abstract or pure time versus the content of time, (i.e., events, activities, and other goings-on). Or, more specifically, the utility of these two sorts of time in time-keeping or temporal organization. It is often assumed that abstract, uniform, and objective time is a universal physical entity out there, which humans may perceive of. However, this sort of evenly flowing time was only recently introduced to the human community, together with the mechanical clock. Before the introduction of mechanical clock-time, there were only events available to denote the extent of time. Events defined time, unlike the way time may define events in our present day culture. It is therefore conceivable that our primeval or natural mode of time-keeping involves the perception, estimation, and coordination of events. I find it likely that events continues to subserve our sense of time and time-keeping efforts, especially for children who have not yet mastered the use of clock-time. Instead of seeing events as a distraction to our perception of time, I suggest that our experience and understanding of time emerges from our perception of events.

No MeSH data available.