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16S gut community of the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort.

Ross MC, Muzny DM, McCormick JB, Gibbs RA, Fisher-Hoch SP, Petrosino JF - Microbiome (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies.We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA ; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are major public health concerns worldwide, and their prevalence has only increased in recent years. Mexican Americans are disproportionately afflicted by obesity and T2D, and rates are even higher in the United States-Mexico border region. To determine the factors associated with the increased risk of T2D, obesity, and other diseases in this population, the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort was established in 2004.

Results: In this study, we characterized the 16S gut community of a subset of 63 subjects from this unique cohort. We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies. We also examined microbial network relationships between operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) and three additional datasets. We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.

Conclusions: Through a combination of increased disease prevalence and relatively high gut microbial homogeneity in the subset of CCHC members we examined, we believe that the CCHC may represent an ideal community to dissect mechanisms underlying the role of the gut microbiome in human health and disease. The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures. This persistent 'disease'-related gut microbial community in CCHC subjects may enhance existing genetic or lifestyle predispositions to the prevalent diseases of the CCHC, leading to increased attack rates of obesity, T2D, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and others.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PrevotellaceaeandPrevotella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Scatter plots representing 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae and the genus Prevotella. Black bars represent mean relative abundance. All P values were calculated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
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Fig7: PrevotellaceaeandPrevotella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Scatter plots representing 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae and the genus Prevotella. Black bars represent mean relative abundance. All P values were calculated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.

Mentions: The Prevotellaceae family has exhibited strong positive associations with obesity [55] and impaired glucose tolerance [56], while having a negative association with type 1 diabetes [57,58]. In the CCHC, subjects clustered distinctly by their relative abundance of Prevotella into two groups (Figure 7). Of note, Bergstrom et al. [19] found a bimodal distribution of Prevotella apparent by the third year of life, and Roager et al. [18] showed that, in adults, this high/low Prevotella grouping remained stable during a 6-month dietary intervention, even after courses of antibiotics. Numerous recent studies have linked high prevalence of this family to a predominately plant-based diet [47,59-61]. However, it seems unlikely that differences in diet are the sole explanation for the bimodal distribution of Prevotella within the CCHC. All of the CCHC subjects are from the same general neighborhood, are of the same ethnicity, share similar socioeconomic status, and in some cases are family members. Interestingly, family members were as often discordant for high/low Prevotella grouping as concordant. This suggests factors additional to diet may determine the prevalence of Prevotella in the gut microbial community. In the CCHC, the bimodal distribution was not explained by age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, income quartile, birth country, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high blood pressure, diabetes status, fasting glucose, or weight change over 5 years (as percentage of body weight). This recurring observation of sample division by high/low Prevotella abundance remains intriguing; however, none of the metadata we examined suggests a reason for the distinct grouping.Figure 7


16S gut community of the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort.

Ross MC, Muzny DM, McCormick JB, Gibbs RA, Fisher-Hoch SP, Petrosino JF - Microbiome (2015)

PrevotellaceaeandPrevotella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Scatter plots representing 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae and the genus Prevotella. Black bars represent mean relative abundance. All P values were calculated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355967&req=5

Fig7: PrevotellaceaeandPrevotella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Scatter plots representing 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae and the genus Prevotella. Black bars represent mean relative abundance. All P values were calculated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
Mentions: The Prevotellaceae family has exhibited strong positive associations with obesity [55] and impaired glucose tolerance [56], while having a negative association with type 1 diabetes [57,58]. In the CCHC, subjects clustered distinctly by their relative abundance of Prevotella into two groups (Figure 7). Of note, Bergstrom et al. [19] found a bimodal distribution of Prevotella apparent by the third year of life, and Roager et al. [18] showed that, in adults, this high/low Prevotella grouping remained stable during a 6-month dietary intervention, even after courses of antibiotics. Numerous recent studies have linked high prevalence of this family to a predominately plant-based diet [47,59-61]. However, it seems unlikely that differences in diet are the sole explanation for the bimodal distribution of Prevotella within the CCHC. All of the CCHC subjects are from the same general neighborhood, are of the same ethnicity, share similar socioeconomic status, and in some cases are family members. Interestingly, family members were as often discordant for high/low Prevotella grouping as concordant. This suggests factors additional to diet may determine the prevalence of Prevotella in the gut microbial community. In the CCHC, the bimodal distribution was not explained by age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, income quartile, birth country, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high blood pressure, diabetes status, fasting glucose, or weight change over 5 years (as percentage of body weight). This recurring observation of sample division by high/low Prevotella abundance remains intriguing; however, none of the metadata we examined suggests a reason for the distinct grouping.Figure 7

Bottom Line: We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies.We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA ; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are major public health concerns worldwide, and their prevalence has only increased in recent years. Mexican Americans are disproportionately afflicted by obesity and T2D, and rates are even higher in the United States-Mexico border region. To determine the factors associated with the increased risk of T2D, obesity, and other diseases in this population, the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort was established in 2004.

Results: In this study, we characterized the 16S gut community of a subset of 63 subjects from this unique cohort. We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies. We also examined microbial network relationships between operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) and three additional datasets. We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.

Conclusions: Through a combination of increased disease prevalence and relatively high gut microbial homogeneity in the subset of CCHC members we examined, we believe that the CCHC may represent an ideal community to dissect mechanisms underlying the role of the gut microbiome in human health and disease. The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures. This persistent 'disease'-related gut microbial community in CCHC subjects may enhance existing genetic or lifestyle predispositions to the prevalent diseases of the CCHC, leading to increased attack rates of obesity, T2D, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and others.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus