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16S gut community of the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort.

Ross MC, Muzny DM, McCormick JB, Gibbs RA, Fisher-Hoch SP, Petrosino JF - Microbiome (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies.We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA ; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are major public health concerns worldwide, and their prevalence has only increased in recent years. Mexican Americans are disproportionately afflicted by obesity and T2D, and rates are even higher in the United States-Mexico border region. To determine the factors associated with the increased risk of T2D, obesity, and other diseases in this population, the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort was established in 2004.

Results: In this study, we characterized the 16S gut community of a subset of 63 subjects from this unique cohort. We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies. We also examined microbial network relationships between operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) and three additional datasets. We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.

Conclusions: Through a combination of increased disease prevalence and relatively high gut microbial homogeneity in the subset of CCHC members we examined, we believe that the CCHC may represent an ideal community to dissect mechanisms underlying the role of the gut microbiome in human health and disease. The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures. This persistent 'disease'-related gut microbial community in CCHC subjects may enhance existing genetic or lifestyle predispositions to the prevalent diseases of the CCHC, leading to increased attack rates of obesity, T2D, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and others.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CoriobacteriaceaeandCollinsella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Tukey style box plots of the differences in 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Coriobacteriaceae and the genus Collinsella between CCHC and HMP subject stool samples. Statistical significance was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
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Fig5: CoriobacteriaceaeandCollinsella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Tukey style box plots of the differences in 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Coriobacteriaceae and the genus Collinsella between CCHC and HMP subject stool samples. Statistical significance was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.

Mentions: In this subset of CCHC members compared to the HMP, we find significantly increased Coriobacteriaceae, and specifically the genus Collinsella (Figure 5). These shifts are strongly correlated with high low-density lipoprotein levels and high total cholesterol in both human and animal studies [43,44]. For example, the observation was made decades ago that germ-free animals have higher serum cholesterol [45]. Individuals with borderline-high total cholesterol (≥200 mg/dL) and high total cholesterol (≥240 mg/dL) are more prevalent in these CCHC study subjects compared to Mexican Americans nationwide (CCHC 50% and 22.2% versus all Mexican Americans 46.4% and 14.3%, respectively). Additionally, a higher proportion of CCHC subjects in this study have elevated LDL cholesterol (≥130 mg/dL) versus Mexican Americans nationally (CCHC 30.2% versus all Mexican Americans 27.7%). Members of the Coriobacteriaceae family respond to dietary interventions involving grain sorghum lipids and dietary whole grains that decrease cholesterol absorption by the host [21,46]. Coriobacteriaceae levels were negatively associated with improved metabolic and immunological markers after dietary intervention [21]. Similarly, studies also noted significantly higher Collinsella in omnivores compared to vegetarians [47] and significant reductions of Collinsella on a low-carb weight loss diet [48]. Together these observations show that Collinsella and perhaps other members of Coriobacteriaceae are often positively correlated with disease, particularly elevated cholesterol, and may be a worthwhile target for behavioral, probiotic, and/or prebiotic manipulation or as a diagnostic biomarker.Figure 5


16S gut community of the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort.

Ross MC, Muzny DM, McCormick JB, Gibbs RA, Fisher-Hoch SP, Petrosino JF - Microbiome (2015)

CoriobacteriaceaeandCollinsella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Tukey style box plots of the differences in 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Coriobacteriaceae and the genus Collinsella between CCHC and HMP subject stool samples. Statistical significance was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355967&req=5

Fig5: CoriobacteriaceaeandCollinsella16S rRNA relative abundance differences between CCHC and HMP stool samples. Tukey style box plots of the differences in 16S rRNA relative abundance of the family Coriobacteriaceae and the genus Collinsella between CCHC and HMP subject stool samples. Statistical significance was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test where **** = P < 0.0001; HMP n = 213, CCHC n = 63. CCHC, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort; HMP, Human Microbiome Project.
Mentions: In this subset of CCHC members compared to the HMP, we find significantly increased Coriobacteriaceae, and specifically the genus Collinsella (Figure 5). These shifts are strongly correlated with high low-density lipoprotein levels and high total cholesterol in both human and animal studies [43,44]. For example, the observation was made decades ago that germ-free animals have higher serum cholesterol [45]. Individuals with borderline-high total cholesterol (≥200 mg/dL) and high total cholesterol (≥240 mg/dL) are more prevalent in these CCHC study subjects compared to Mexican Americans nationwide (CCHC 50% and 22.2% versus all Mexican Americans 46.4% and 14.3%, respectively). Additionally, a higher proportion of CCHC subjects in this study have elevated LDL cholesterol (≥130 mg/dL) versus Mexican Americans nationally (CCHC 30.2% versus all Mexican Americans 27.7%). Members of the Coriobacteriaceae family respond to dietary interventions involving grain sorghum lipids and dietary whole grains that decrease cholesterol absorption by the host [21,46]. Coriobacteriaceae levels were negatively associated with improved metabolic and immunological markers after dietary intervention [21]. Similarly, studies also noted significantly higher Collinsella in omnivores compared to vegetarians [47] and significant reductions of Collinsella on a low-carb weight loss diet [48]. Together these observations show that Collinsella and perhaps other members of Coriobacteriaceae are often positively correlated with disease, particularly elevated cholesterol, and may be a worthwhile target for behavioral, probiotic, and/or prebiotic manipulation or as a diagnostic biomarker.Figure 5

Bottom Line: We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies.We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA ; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are major public health concerns worldwide, and their prevalence has only increased in recent years. Mexican Americans are disproportionately afflicted by obesity and T2D, and rates are even higher in the United States-Mexico border region. To determine the factors associated with the increased risk of T2D, obesity, and other diseases in this population, the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort was established in 2004.

Results: In this study, we characterized the 16S gut community of a subset of 63 subjects from this unique cohort. We found that these communities, when compared to Human Microbiome Project subjects, exhibit community shifts often observed in obese and T2D individuals in published studies. We also examined microbial network relationships between operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) and three additional datasets. We identified a group of seven genera that form a tightly interconnected network present in all four tested datasets, dominated by butyrate producers, which are often increased in obese individuals while being depleted in T2D patients.

Conclusions: Through a combination of increased disease prevalence and relatively high gut microbial homogeneity in the subset of CCHC members we examined, we believe that the CCHC may represent an ideal community to dissect mechanisms underlying the role of the gut microbiome in human health and disease. The lack of CCHC subject gut community segregation based on all tested metadata suggests that the community structure we observe in the CCHC likely occurs early in life, and endures. This persistent 'disease'-related gut microbial community in CCHC subjects may enhance existing genetic or lifestyle predispositions to the prevalent diseases of the CCHC, leading to increased attack rates of obesity, T2D, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and others.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus