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Evaluation of a topical herbal agent for the promotion of bone healing.

Siu WS, Ko CH, Lam KW, Wat E, Shum WT, Lau CB, Ko KM, Hung LK, Lau DT, Leung PC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: This indicated its anti-inflammatory effect.However, CDNR did not affect the bone turnover markers in serum of the rats.With its anti-inflammatory and bone formation properties, CDNR is found effective in promoting bone healing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Chinese Medicine, 5/F, The CUHK Hong Kong Jockey Club School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong ; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong ; Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
A topically used Chinese herbal paste, namely, CDNR, was designed to facilitate fracture healing which is usually not addressed in general hospital care. From our in vitro studies, CDNR significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide from RAW264.7 cells by 51 to 77%. This indicated its anti-inflammatory effect. CDNR also promoted the growth of bone cells by stimulating the proliferation of UMR106 cells up to 18%. It also increased the biomechanical strength of the healing bone in a drill-hole defect rat model by 16.5% significantly. This result revealed its in vivo efficacy on facilitation of bone healing. Furthermore, the detection of the chemical markers of CDNR in the skin and muscle of the treatment area demonstrated its transdermal properties. However, CDNR did not affect the bone turnover markers in serum of the rats. With its anti-inflammatory and bone formation properties, CDNR is found effective in promoting bone healing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anti-inflammatory effects of CDNR. (a, b) Effect of aqueous (CDNR(aq)) and ethanol (CDNR(e)) component of CDNR on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW264.7 induced by LPS; (c, d, and e) Effect of CDNR(e) on TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production by RAW264.7. Data are expressed as mean and standard deviation (error bar). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.001 versus Control (0 μg/mL).
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fig1: Anti-inflammatory effects of CDNR. (a, b) Effect of aqueous (CDNR(aq)) and ethanol (CDNR(e)) component of CDNR on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW264.7 induced by LPS; (c, d, and e) Effect of CDNR(e) on TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production by RAW264.7. Data are expressed as mean and standard deviation (error bar). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.001 versus Control (0 μg/mL).

Mentions: Results demonstrated that CDNR(aq) did not affect the NO production in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells (Figure 1(a)). In contrast, CDNR(e), at 100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL, significantly suppressed the NO production in RAW264.7 cells after LPS induction by 51% and 77%, respectively (P < 0.001), when compared to the control group without herbal treatment (0 μg/mL) (Figure 1(b)). However, CDNR(e) was nontoxic to the cells because it did not affect the normal cellular activity at concentration lower than 200 μg/mL (data not shown). CDNR(e) also suppressed the proinflammatory cytokines production in RAW264.7 cells after LPS induction. At 200 μg/mL, it effectively downregulated the production of TNF-α (by 25.2%, P < 0.05; Figure 1(c)), IL-6 (by 35.2%, P < 0.001; Figure 1(d)), and IL-1β (by 20.9%, P < 0.05; Figure 1(e)) when compared with its corresponding controls, which further indicated that CDNR(e) was anti-inflammatory.


Evaluation of a topical herbal agent for the promotion of bone healing.

Siu WS, Ko CH, Lam KW, Wat E, Shum WT, Lau CB, Ko KM, Hung LK, Lau DT, Leung PC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Anti-inflammatory effects of CDNR. (a, b) Effect of aqueous (CDNR(aq)) and ethanol (CDNR(e)) component of CDNR on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW264.7 induced by LPS; (c, d, and e) Effect of CDNR(e) on TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production by RAW264.7. Data are expressed as mean and standard deviation (error bar). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.001 versus Control (0 μg/mL).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355818&req=5

fig1: Anti-inflammatory effects of CDNR. (a, b) Effect of aqueous (CDNR(aq)) and ethanol (CDNR(e)) component of CDNR on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW264.7 induced by LPS; (c, d, and e) Effect of CDNR(e) on TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production by RAW264.7. Data are expressed as mean and standard deviation (error bar). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.001 versus Control (0 μg/mL).
Mentions: Results demonstrated that CDNR(aq) did not affect the NO production in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells (Figure 1(a)). In contrast, CDNR(e), at 100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL, significantly suppressed the NO production in RAW264.7 cells after LPS induction by 51% and 77%, respectively (P < 0.001), when compared to the control group without herbal treatment (0 μg/mL) (Figure 1(b)). However, CDNR(e) was nontoxic to the cells because it did not affect the normal cellular activity at concentration lower than 200 μg/mL (data not shown). CDNR(e) also suppressed the proinflammatory cytokines production in RAW264.7 cells after LPS induction. At 200 μg/mL, it effectively downregulated the production of TNF-α (by 25.2%, P < 0.05; Figure 1(c)), IL-6 (by 35.2%, P < 0.001; Figure 1(d)), and IL-1β (by 20.9%, P < 0.05; Figure 1(e)) when compared with its corresponding controls, which further indicated that CDNR(e) was anti-inflammatory.

Bottom Line: This indicated its anti-inflammatory effect.However, CDNR did not affect the bone turnover markers in serum of the rats.With its anti-inflammatory and bone formation properties, CDNR is found effective in promoting bone healing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Chinese Medicine, 5/F, The CUHK Hong Kong Jockey Club School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong ; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong ; Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
A topically used Chinese herbal paste, namely, CDNR, was designed to facilitate fracture healing which is usually not addressed in general hospital care. From our in vitro studies, CDNR significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide from RAW264.7 cells by 51 to 77%. This indicated its anti-inflammatory effect. CDNR also promoted the growth of bone cells by stimulating the proliferation of UMR106 cells up to 18%. It also increased the biomechanical strength of the healing bone in a drill-hole defect rat model by 16.5% significantly. This result revealed its in vivo efficacy on facilitation of bone healing. Furthermore, the detection of the chemical markers of CDNR in the skin and muscle of the treatment area demonstrated its transdermal properties. However, CDNR did not affect the bone turnover markers in serum of the rats. With its anti-inflammatory and bone formation properties, CDNR is found effective in promoting bone healing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus