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Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical structure of N10O (zwitterionic form).
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f5: Chemical structure of N10O (zwitterionic form).

Mentions: 1H, 31P and 13C NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker Avance 500 spectrometer operating at 500.1, 202.5 and 125.8 MHz, respectively. TSP was used as an internal standard for 1H and 13C measurements, and 85% H3PO4 was used as an external standard for 31P measurements. The nJCP couplings were calculated from carbon spectra with the coupling constants given in parenthesis as hertz. Particle size of N10O was determined by JEOL JEM-2100F Transmission Electron Microscope and surface area by BET method57. Metal concentrations were analyzed either by a Perkin Elmer 5100 atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS) by using air-acetylene flame or by an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). A Thermo Electron iCAP 6600 Duo View equipped with Cetac ASX-520Hs and an autosampler were used. Solubility of N10O in water and phosphorus content of N10O were determined at 880 nm by Jasco V-530 spectrophotometer using the molybdenum blue method58. Liquid samples were filtered (0.2 μm membrane filter) and solid samples were decomposed with nitric acid by the microwave digestion technique using CEM MDS-81D Microwave System prior to determination. Elemental analysis (C, H, N) was accomplished with a ThermoQuest CE Instruments EA 1110-CHNS-O elemental analyzer (CE Instruments, Milan, Italy).


Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

Chemical structure of N10O (zwitterionic form).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355739&req=5

f5: Chemical structure of N10O (zwitterionic form).
Mentions: 1H, 31P and 13C NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker Avance 500 spectrometer operating at 500.1, 202.5 and 125.8 MHz, respectively. TSP was used as an internal standard for 1H and 13C measurements, and 85% H3PO4 was used as an external standard for 31P measurements. The nJCP couplings were calculated from carbon spectra with the coupling constants given in parenthesis as hertz. Particle size of N10O was determined by JEOL JEM-2100F Transmission Electron Microscope and surface area by BET method57. Metal concentrations were analyzed either by a Perkin Elmer 5100 atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS) by using air-acetylene flame or by an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). A Thermo Electron iCAP 6600 Duo View equipped with Cetac ASX-520Hs and an autosampler were used. Solubility of N10O in water and phosphorus content of N10O were determined at 880 nm by Jasco V-530 spectrophotometer using the molybdenum blue method58. Liquid samples were filtered (0.2 μm membrane filter) and solid samples were decomposed with nitric acid by the microwave digestion technique using CEM MDS-81D Microwave System prior to determination. Elemental analysis (C, H, N) was accomplished with a ThermoQuest CE Instruments EA 1110-CHNS-O elemental analyzer (CE Instruments, Milan, Italy).

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.